Category Archives: Ovando

Slay the Snow: Sled Epic Terrain in Western Montana

It’s no secret that Montana is a pretty big place with plenty of room to roam. We like to take advantage of all that gorgeous open space and cover as much ground as we can, especially in winter when we can power up our sleds and snowmobile miles and miles of bragworthy winter-wonderland terrain.

Unleash your inner powder hound on Glacier Country’s outstanding terrain. Photo: Warren Miller Entertainment

4,000 miles of scenic groomed trails crisscross Montana, and untouched backcountry powder playgrounds are too many to count. You’ll find world-class snowmobiling under our famously big blue skies, with some of the best riding in the state right here in Western Montana’s Glacier Country. Mesmerizing woodland landscapes are interwoven with premier mountain towns, where charm and hospitality are in abundance, and an obsession with snow is palpable. More than 300 inches of powder falls annually around these parts, and you’ve got easy access to trails and open space.

Though snowmobiling within Glacier National Park is prohibited, the beauty and sheer wild wonder of the park can be viewed for miles beyond, and the charming small towns just outside the park are open year-round and always at the ready to host winter outdoor lovers with warm lodging and inviting amenities. Test your mettle in Montana’s rugged and remote Marias Pass Trail Complex, or head beyond the park’s surrounding towns, where there’s much more riding to be had.

Be the first to traverse snow-laden backcountry playgrounds. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

Discover the recreation wonderland of Western Montana’s Flathead Valley, explore extensive family-friendly trails in the Haugan area, crush a ride in scenic Kootenai Country, slay the Skalkaho Pass in the beautiful Bitterroot Valley, or fan out from a Missoula basecamp and explore Lolo Pass or the Garnet Ghost Town trail system. There’s brand new terrain to be explored in Glacier Country, too. In the summer of 2017 two wildland fires burned areas in Seeley Lake, Ovando and Libby, making way for new riding terrain. Come Sled the Burn.

Sledders wind their way through mountains tinted by alpenglow.

Snowmobiling in Western Montana’s Glacier Country is matched only by that of snowmobiling in Yellowstone Country Montana. The sledding opportunities in these regions are renowned, and the season here is quite long. For a park-to-park adventure, take a Glaciers to Geysers sled tour. Find itineraries, trails, resources and snowmobile club information all on our new and very helpful glacierstogeysers.com website.

Part of the beauty of a “sledventure” in Glacier Country is the post-sled revelry. Did you know Montana ranks 4th in the nation for breweries per capita? Countless breweries and distilleries dot the region. When it’s time to power down, pull up a barstool for a finely crafted beer or a whiskey made from glacial waters and locally-sourced ingredients. You’ll find yourself in the midst of a community of fellow sled heads, all with a tale to tell of a killer day in unfathomably deep, fresh powder. Our downtown regions focus on authentic experiences, where food and drinks are a priority, lodging is exceptional, and there are plenty of places to fuel up on caffeine before a day of snow play.

Snowmobiling leads to unbelievable snowscapes and lasting friendships. Photo: Lincoln County SnoKat Club

Beginners to expert sled heads will all find their place here, and there are plenty of guides and outfitters available to help you out. Plus, local snowmobile clubs are always at the ready to hook you up with trail details.

For groomed trail information as well as information on passes and permits, visit Glacier Country Tourism and Glaciers to Geysers. As always, sled safe and check avalanche reports before you power up.

Order your free Montana Snowmobiling Guide and trail map.

 

Holiday Charm in Western Montana

Winter in Western Montana’s Glacier Country is pure magic; we really know how to deck the halls and celebrate the season of giving with all things merry and bright. It’s also true that winter’s the time of year when it’s pretty easy to get a little stir crazy, which is why we fill the season with holiday events and celebrations galore.

Deck the halls! Bigfork, Montana shows off its western holiday spirit. Photo: Bigfork Chamber of Commerce

HOLIDAY STROLLS AND PARADES OF LIGHT

You would be hard-pressed to find a more authentic Western Montana evening than a Christmas stroll. Wander the streets and enjoy the perfect combination of wagon rides, chestnut roasting and vendors selling Montana-made goods and artisan crafts. The holiday celebration doesn’t end there. Experience the splendor of a Parade of Light and prepare to be swept up in the magic of the holidays. Sightings include Santa, reindeer and floats adorned in lights galore.

Glacier Country gives family time a whole new meaning. Photo: Chelsea Culp

HOLIDAY CHEER AT THE THEATER

If you are ready to cozy up inside for a unique and unforgettable winter experience you will be pleasantly surprised to find out that the state’s rugged exterior belies a highly developed artistic sensibility. Musicals, symphony concerts, ballets and more dot the region during the holiday season and are a Western Montana specialty. Attend the timeless performance of “The Nutcracker Ballet” (University of Montana’s Adams Center), enjoy a buttered popcorn and a soda or adult beverage while watching classics like “It’s a Wonderful Life” (Roxy Theater), or listen to This Sacred Season and “Messiah” with the Glacier Symphony (Whitefish Performing Arts Center). Here are many ways you can add a splash of culture to the holiday season.

The grace and tradition of Missoula’s Nutcracker performance will be the highlight of your holiday season. Photo: Garden City Ballet – Neil Chaput de Saintonge

HOLIDAY BAZAAR

One of the things Western Montana does best is put on a good holiday bazaar. Embrace the spirit of giving this season with gifts from locally sourced and canned foods, hand-crafted jewelry, pottery, woodworking, handmade soaps and other Montana artisan goods and wares. While you’re browsing, be sure to enjoy a cup of cocoa and mingle with the locals—we’re known for being some of the friendliest folks around.

So many different and amazing choices for children and adults alike. Photo: HandMADE Montana -Carol Lynn Lapotka

NEW YEAR’S EVE

Glacier Country Montana is always ready to make your trip memorable, but there is a special atmosphere around New Year’s Eve. Whether you are looking for a night out dancing, a fireworks send-off under the vast night sky, or a low-key night downtown without the big-city crowds—we’ve got the best place to close out the holidays and make your 2019 resolutions.

Send off 2018 with a bang. Photo: Flathead Beacon – Lido Vizzutti

MUST-STOP TOWNS BURSTING WITH HOLIDAY CHARM

Bigfork: Located on the bay of Flathead Lake, the storybook town of Bigfork gets a little magical around the holidays. The community “elves” come together every year to adorn the town with wreaths, ribbon, garland and lights, creating authentic Western Montana holiday charm.

Whitefish: The quintessential mountain resort town of Whitefish goes all out creating an enchanting winter wonderland. A stroll through downtown will yield bells, wreaths, boughs and lights ornamenting each business and weaving through the streets.

Ovando: Another stop-worthy town is Ovando. This quaint (and beyond adorable) town lays on the charm for the holiday season. Downtown, the 100-year-old buildings create the atmosphere of an authentic Old West holiday.

Not many places celebrate the holidays like Whitefish, Montana. Photo: Brian Schott

You can also check out a full listing of holiday events at glaciermt.com/events.

12 Hidden-Treasure State Parks + Camping Sites in Western Montana

Part of what makes Western Montana’s great outdoors so great is the abundance of explore-worthy, off-the-beaten-path public lands. Admittedly, we’re a little obsessed with visiting the lesser-known gems of Glacier Country, where crowds are light or non-existent and the adventure is always one of discovery.

Montana State Parks

Montana’s state parks are preserved for their natural beauty and amazing recreation opportunities. These heavenly places are some of the greatest natural and cultural treasures around. Here, we’ve listed a few that aren’t usually overcrowded and offer unforgettable authentic Montana experiences. State park campsites can be reserved, and you’ll also find ample water recreation activities like fishing, swimming and boating, plus RV access, picnic areas and latrines.

Lake Mary Ronan State Park

Known for epic fishing, Lake Mary Ronan State Park—just 7 miles west of Flathead Lake—also offers numerous hiking trails and individual campsites among lush forestland, perfect for spotting wildlife and wildflowers. For season and hours, plus amenities, activities and contact information, click here.

Lake Mary Ronan State Park is quaint and quiet, but offers plenty of recreational activities and beautiful views. Photo: Pat Doyle

Thompson Chain of Lakes + Logan State Park

How does shoreline access to 18 sparkling glacial lakes within a 20-mile stretch sound? Thompson Chain of Lakes offers 3,000 acres of excellent fishing, boating, camping, birding and hiking. Logan State Park, located on Middle Thompson Lake, is a heavily forested family-fun hot spot. For season and hours, plus amenities, activities and contact information, click here.

Thompson Falls State Park

Relax in the quiet Clark Fork Valley among old-growth pine, and explore the Thompson Falls Trail along the scenic Clark Fork River. The park also features a family fishing pond, camping and bird-watching. For season and hours, plus amenities, activities and contact information, click here.

Whether you’re camping, fishing or simply enjoying the scenery, Thompson Falls State Park is the perfect place to be. Photo: Andy Austin

Camping at Fish Access Sites

Here’s a fun little secret: many Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks fishing access sites offer camping. Sites can’t be reserved in advance, however, so make sure you have a backup plan. Check links below for individual site amenities, but note that these are all dry camping spots with no electric/water/sewer services available. Most sites also include boat launches, and all include opportunities to recreate.

Harpers Lake
Camp along the beautiful Clearwater River at Harpers Lake or neighboring Blanchard Lake. Sites are close to the road, offering easy access.
14 campsites + gravel boat launch
31 miles east of Bonner on Highway 200, turn north on Highway 83 for 2 miles

Fishing access sites are a great camping option throughout Western Montana. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

Island Lake
One of Montana’s newly developed fishing access sites, Island Lake has enhanced the fishing opportunities between Libby and Kalispell and the small number of campsites means solitude under a starry night sky.
3 campsites + boat launch
46 miles west of Kalispell

Upsata Lake
Enjoy stunning views of the entrance to Montana’s Bob Marshall Wilderness as well as lush, rolling prairie land.
6 campsites + gravel boat launch
37 miles east of Bonner on Highway 200 to milepost 38, then 4 miles north on Woodworth Road

Blackfoot River Corridor

Made famous by Norman Maclean’s “A River Runs Through It,” the Blackfoot River is one of Montana’s most popular, and the 26-mile Blackfoot River Corridor offers some of the best trout fishing in the state. This favorite of floaters ranges from slow-moving to whitewater, and the corridor’s numerous fishing access sites offer a diversity of camping options in the heart of one of Montana’s most treasured areas. Added bonus: the Blackfoot River Corridor Scenic Drive.

The Blackfoot River is a Glacier Country gem. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

Russell Gates
Russell Gates—a popular rafting put-in and take-out—lays on the charm with a fantastic view, plenty of shade trees, wide-river fishing and lots of deer.
12 campsites + gravel boat launch
River right, mile 40, 34 miles east of Bonner on Highway 200

Ninemile Prairie
Solitude abounds at Ninemile Prairie, with only a few campsites.
3 campsites
River right, mile 25, 25.5 miles east of Bonner on Highway 200, turn west (just before mile marker 27) on Ninemile Prairie Road for 4.2 miles

Corrick’s River Bend
Sleep out under our signature sky among majestic ponderosa pines at this scenic river spot.
12 campsites + boat launch
River right, mile 23, 25.5 miles east of Bonner on Highway 200, then 6 miles west on Ninemile Prairie Road 

Thibodeau
Find fun tubing down Thibodeau Falls ending at this popular campsite, and by night experience the peaceful sound of the river flowing.
6 campsites + potable water
River left, mile 18, 10.3 miles east of Bonner on Highway 200, turn north of Johnsrud Park Road for 5.5 miles

Main Blackfoot River

There’s even more solitude to be found the higher you go on the Blackfoot. Up the river from Russell Gates, you’ll find the following Western Montana gems:

Harry Morgan
This popular launch point makes for a great rustic overnight camping experience on the edge of crystal-clear Blackfoot waters.
4 campsites + gravel boat launch
River right, mile 2, 3.5 miles south of Ovando on the Ovando-Helmville Road

River Junction
Set up camp at River Junction for access to one very spectacular stretch of the famous Blackfoot River.
6 campsites + primitive boat launch
River right, mile 52, 38 miles east of Bonner on Highway 200, turn southeast on an unmarked county road (FAS sign at the junction) for 9 rough miles, follow the signs

Blackfoot River Float-In Campsites

Turn your float-fishing trip into an overnight adventure. The float-in campsite program on the Blackfoot lets you float right into your rustic overnight accommodations. Float-in sites are River Junction, Clearwater, Corrick’s River Bend and Ninemile Prairie. A special permit is required. Click here for more information.

Pro-tip: Always be sure to be up to date on all closures and restrictions before heading into any of these state parks or campsites.

Hidden History Gems: Meet Montana’s Off-The-Beaten-Path Museums

History buffs + eager explorers—this one’s for you. Western Montana is home to several museums, some of which are a little off the beaten path, making them all the more explore-worthy. These hidden gems display everything from American Indian beadwork to homesteader history to storied lake monsters, and each one offers a celebration and preservation of Montana’s rich heritage, coupled with a unique adventure in small-town discovery.

The eclectic Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

TROY MUSEUM & VISITOR CENTER
Troy, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Step back in time and experience the cultural and natural heritage of Troy Learn about Troy’s homesteading days, mining and logging life, and the 1910 fire, and play a round of folf (frisbee golf) at the museum’s on-site course. If you time it right, you can attend the Arts on the Grass event on the museum lawn, where local artists and craftspeople sell their handmade work, perfect for taking something home to remember us by.

OLD JAIL MUSEUM
Thompson Falls, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Visit one of Sanders County’s oldest buildings, now honoring the pioneers who settled our corner of Big Sky Country. The Old Jail Museum was formerly the county jail, and sheriff’s office and residence. View historical artifacts, maps and photographs taken from original glass negatives giving a glimpse into the early days of mining, logging, farming and ranching in Sanders County. Also, the town of Thompson Falls is a hidden gem in and of itself, offering Clark Fork River access and pristine national forestland recreation.

NINEPIPES MUSEUM OF EARLY MONTANA
Charlo, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Nestled in the breathtaking Mission Mountains, this Mission Valley treasure protects and preserves the history and culture of the Flathead Indian Reservation, home to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. You’ll find American Indian artifacts (including a large collection of beadwork); a life-size diorama of wildlife in an early camp scene complete with elk-hide tipis; vintage photographs; a collection of weaponry; and a gallery of Old West art. Ninepipes offers tours and a nature trail, plus it’s close to the National Bison Range and bordered by Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge, so be prepared to spend some time in the area.

Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana display’s the history and culture of the Flathead Indian People.

MUSEUM OF THE PLAINS INDIAN
Browning, Montana
Open: Year-Round
This permanent exhibition gallery displays a diverse and bountiful collection of historic art created by tribal people of the Northern Plains, as well as contemporary work by American Indian artists and craftspeople. You’ll find traditional, detailed costumes on life-size figures. Other displays exhibit the social and ceremonial aspects of the region’s tribes. Help support individual artists and craftspeople by taking home a meaningful souvenir. The museum galleries offer oil paintings, watercolors, sculptures, beadwork and traditional crafts for sale.

Blackfeet exhibit at Museum of the Plains Indian. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

TOBACCO VALLEY HISTORICAL VILLAGE
Eureka, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Sitting along the Tobacco River, this unique, volunteer-run village houses a collection of historic buildings from the 1880s and early 1900s. Explore a schoolhouse, church, library, general store, fire tower, railroad depot, caboose and several log cabins, all outfitted with era-appropriate artifacts. Interpretive programs are also offered on site. Bring a picnic lunch, and explore the adjoining Eureka Riverwalk Trail or the Eureka Kootenai Rails to Trails/Tobacco River Memorial Trail.

LARUE-HOT SPRINGS MUSEUM
Hot Springs, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Paying homage to the Hot Springs homesteader days, this little gem showcases a gathering of artifacts from local tribes and homesteader families, plus a large doll collection and the trophies and ribbons won by local resident Fay Hayne, a local trick rider and barrel racer. Also on display, 120 years of VFW uniforms and memorabilia, antique farming equipment and trucks, plus artifacts from local merchants, craftsmen and ranchers. Explore a historic cabin and the original Hot Springs concrete jail.

GLACIER COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM & ARCHIVE
Cut Bank, Montana
Open: Year-Round
This museum includes a captivating collection of historical artifacts, buildings and memorabilia on display, as well as a comprehensive early history of the people of the region, including a vast Blackfeet Indian collection. The 14-acre site is home to two museum exhibit buildings, an oil worker’s house, oil derrick, 1917 schoolhouse, 1980’s caboose and a living-history interpretive replica homestead house and farm. History buffs can also find educational and interactive exhibits on Lewis and Clark, local artists, community businesses, oil and Cut Bank’s early days.

The Glacier County Historical Museum has numerous displays and exhibits of the county’s diverse past.

POLSON FLATHEAD HISTORICAL MUSEUM
Polson, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Home of the Flathead Lake Monster—a 7.5-foot, 181-pound sturgeon caught in Flathead Lake in 1955—the Polson-Flathead Historical Museum offers firsthand examples of the trials of surviving the harsh conditions of the region’s homesteading days. Exhibits include a trading post, stagecoaches, a chuck wagon and buggies, a pioneer kitchen, Calamity Jane’s saddle from her “Last Ride,” firefighting equipment and antique trucks that still work!

SEELEY LAKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM
Seeley Lake, Montana
Open: Year-Round
The old Double Arrow Ranch barn is now the site of the Seeley Lake Historical Museum and Visitor Center, recalling the past of the Seeley Lake region. Outside displays include a horse-drawn log-haul wagon, a gravel haul and spread wagon, a Lewis and Clark Botanical Garden, Blackfoot Indian Lodge, a dugout canoe and a forthcoming 100-year-old canoe. The grounds also include seven double (two-horse) stalls featuring locally-themed displays named after the horses who occupied them, such as Nip & Tuck: Old Time Logging; Ace & Joker: Norman Maclean Fire and Fish Display; and Popcorn & Peanuts: Cabin Fever Cures.

BRAND BAR MUSEUM
Ovando, Montana
Open: Year-Round
Formerly a saloon once referred to as the “Bucket of Blood,” the Brand Bar Museum today houses Ovando memorabilia and stories of days gone by. This collection of local history and unique antiques also has a hoosegow—a jail for visitors—where you can overnight in a bunk (or you can camp out on the lawn). The Brand Bar Museum is always open. Just ask one of the nearby local businesses for the key. You’ll find it.

A Blackfoot Valley gem: The Brand Bar Museum. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

RAVALLI COUNTY MUSEUM & HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Hamilton, Montana
Open: Year-Round
Blending art with local and natural history, this cultural venue provides rare historical collections honoring our American Indian heritage, life in the West and the travels of Lewis and Clark. Educational programming includes lectures, tours and workshops for children. The museum serves as a hub for community events, including McIntosh Apple Days, A Cowboy Christmas and Bitter Root Day, and is situated at the confluence of the Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail, the Nee-Me-Poo National Historic Trail and the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.

Sled the Burn in Big Sky Country: Montana’s New Snowmobile Playground

Montana’s wild winter wonderland just got even bigger. Thousands of acres of new snowmobiling terrain in Seeley Lake, Ovando and Lincoln have been opened up by last summer’s wildfires. Fire season is par for the course around here, and sometimes the flames can be devastating, but they’re also a natural and important part of the regeneration of the land. And, in this case, they’ve gifted sled heads a new powder paradise to play in.

Snowmobiling and sled skiing are some of the best ways to cover vast expanses of sought-after terrain in Glacier Country. Hundreds of miles of groomed trails and brag-worthy backcountry beckon from fall into spring around here, and, with the burn, Seeley Lake, Ovando and Lincoln are preparing for an epic year of snowmobiling. Sled enthusiasts from far and wide will be eager to power up and plow through the new terrain.

Our region sees over 300 inches of snow each year, and over 600 miles of groomed trails in the Seeley Swan and Blackfoot valleys offer extraordinary snowmobiling and backcountry sled skiing for all skill levels. Add the burn, and this powder haven is a bucket list must.

Riding in Seeley Lake offers thrilling rides and views.  Photo: Warren Miller Entertainment

INSIDER TIPS
There’s something magical about heading out into the great wide open on your own, but we strongly recommend going with a guide. Our experts are just that—experts. They’re also pretty fun to hang out with. They know the terrain, and they know how to show adventurers a good time. Rocky Mountain Adventure Gear offers snowmobile rentals and guided tour packages for up to six people.

SEELEY LAKE
With world-class terrain and breathtaking views, Seeley Lake brings the thrills. 350 miles of trails crisscross the Swan and Mission mountain valleys, and the town’s pretty amazing to boot. Questions about sledding in Seeley? Consult the Seeley Lake Driftriders Snowmobile Club. They’d love to hear from you.

The Double Arrow Lodge
Surrounded by over 300 miles of groomed trails from the flat to the steep, this historic lodge offers the coziest accommodations around. Oh, and their food’s top-notch too. This is in your favor, since you’ll have worked up a big appetite after a big day in big snow.

Lindey’s Prime Steak House
“The place for steak since 1958,” Lindey’s serves up mouthwatering steaks and cocktails to weary winter wanderers. And, since you’ll be there sometime between October and April, you’ll have the added bonus of adding half a pound of king crab legs to your steak dinner.

Moose River Bar & Grill
Steamed clams, Irish nachos and pub pickles after a day in powder paradise? Yes please. Moose River is ready for you. You’re welcome. We’ll see you at the bar.

Big mountain dreams come true in Glacier Country. Photo: Warren Miller Entertainment

OVANDO
Winter in the Blackfoot Valley offers the stuff a snowmobiler’s dreams are made of. Over 500 miles of groomed lakeside, forested and big mountain trails stretch out right from the heart this charming mountain town.

Blackfoot Inn
This historic downtown inn offers comfortable overnight lodging, an iconic convenience store, old-fashioned ice cream, gasoline, and the other necessary fuel—espresso. Power up before you power up.

The Stray Bullet
Rise and shine at this Montana gem. Breakfast is essential, especially before snow play. Try the Side Saddle, the Gunslinger or the Outlaw. Or, stop in for lunch after an early morning ride. Or, both.

Trixi’s Antler Saloon
One of Glacier Country’s most iconic pubs, Trixi’s is the perfect stop to warm up and raise a glass to a good day in the mountains. Bring the whole family or gather with old friends—this place welcomes all who are ready to enjoy fabulous food and authentic Montana hospitality.

Lincoln, Montana showing off the beauty of good snow on a bluebird day. Photo: Southwest Montana Tourism

LINCOLN
250 miles of trails, mountaintop views and deep snow deliver in Lewis and Clark County, no matter your skill level.

Lincoln Pit Stop
Make a post-powder pit stop at this Lincoln treasure for a huckleberry shake. Nothing, not even cold weather, should ever stop you from having a huckleberry milkshake in Montana.

Leeper’s Motel
Just off Highway 200 in a ponderosa pine grove, the charming Leeper’s Motel offers year-round accommodations. With ample sled-trailer parking and close access to Lincoln’s trail systems, this family-owned motel is a great place to stay while visiting the area.

As always, sled safe. Know the laws, procure the permits and be avalanche aware. Winter terrain is pure adventure, but it’s also vital to know the rules of the rugged.

Check out sledtheburn.com for more on these communities, outdoor resources, weather, and trail information. Winter in Montana is wide open, friends. See you on the burn!

Sled the burn in Montana this winter. Enter to win one of three vacation packages here.