Category Archives: Hamilton

Savor Apple Season + Cideries in Western Montana

Autumn is just around the corner and the fresh mountain air isn’t the only thing that’s getting crisp. Montana’s apple game is strong, and apple season is in full swing. That means it’s time for a few of our core favorites—apple picking, apple festivals, apple cider and hard cider.

Order a flight and taste a range of Montana-made hard cider. Photo: Destination Missoula

FRESH APPLES + LOCAL ORCHARDS

Apple growing has deep roots in Montana’s Bitterroot Valley. This apple hot spot is known for family owned and operated orchards boasting several apple varieties as well as natural growing methods, which produce some of the most pristine and delicious apples you’ll ever sink your teeth into.

Fall is the time to get your hands on the freshest apples around. Farm stands, orchards and u-pick operations can be found throughout Western Montana. The best time for apple picking in Glacier Country is usually September through October and even into November, if the weather cooperates. If you’re not up for an apple-picking adventure, look for fresh, locally grown apples at area grocers and farmers markets, where you’re bound to find freshly baked apple pies, too.

Western Cider grows over 50 varieties of apples in its Bitterroot orchard. Photo: Rio Chantel

APPLE EVENTS AND FESTIVITIES

We don’t just savor apples, we celebrate them. Local harvest festivals and autumn events throughout the region highlight this coveted fruit.

McIntosh Apple Day in Hamilton—known as the “Biggest Bake Sale Under the Big Sky”—has been called one of Montana’s Best Fall Festivals by National Geographic Traveler Online and one of the Top Festivals in the United States by Flight Network. On October 5, treat yourself to apple butter, caramel apples and, of course, scratch-made apple pie. This year marks the 40th anniversary of this much-anticipated day, which is followed by the fun-filled Liquid Apple Night—a hard cider festival in Hamilton’s Legion Park featuring cideries from the Rocky Mountain West, plus seasonally inspired food and live music.

Celebrate September 28 through October 5. Cider spirit is high as restaurants, bars, breweries, and cideries step up their cider game on menus and taps throughout the state. Raise a glass!

The gleaming tanks at FireRoot Spirits yield AppleJack, a spirit with early American roots. Photo: FireRoot Spirits

HARD-CORE FLAVOR AT LOCAL CIDERIES

Something else that’s blossoming all over Montana—cideries serving up hard-core Montana craft ciders and spirits made with fresh, local apples. Crisp flavors abound, and you’d be hard-pressed to find a hard cider here that you didn’t like.

It comes as no surprise that award-wining hard cider is coming out of the Bitterroot at Montana CiderWorks. Situated in the iconic Old West town of Darby it was the first commercial cidery in Montana. Backroad Cider in Hamilton is serving up some classic flavors as well as cider with a kick, brewed with jalapeño, habanero and poblano peppers. Wet your whistle at FireRoot Spirits in Florence, serving up farm-distilled spirits like AppleJack apple brandy, and Apple Jill—a smooth whiskey/cider blend that’s perfect on the rocks.

Sample 12 ciders at Western Cider’s tasting room and garden. Photo: Destination Missoula

Missoula is on the cider scene too with Western Cider Co. Try two of their house favorites: Sour Cherry and Whiskey Peach. Head North and you’ll find Big Mountain Ciderworks in Kalispell blending up a unique and mouthwatering apple, cherry, pear fusion. Also in Kalispell, Rough Cut Hard Cider is crafting up some creative concoctions like Bear Food, Rock Powder Rhubarb, Whiskey Rose and the Rough Cut Original. The best time to sample some ciders? Apple season, of course.

 

Late Summer Outdoor Concerts in Western Montana

Summertime and outdoor music go hand in hand in Western Montana. With multiple outdoor venues and one of the most vibrant live music scenes in the West—in Glacier Country’s arts and culture hub of Missoula—it’s no surprise that we get our groove on under the big blue sky late into the season. Here’s where you can catch late-summer 2019 live tunes and local vibes in our corner of Montana.

Big Sky Brewing Amphitheater brings big name performers to Missoula. Photo: Loren Moulton

MUSIC FESTIVALS

In the charming community of Libby, sit along the Kootenai River for “blue, brews and BBQs” at the Riverfront Blues Festival August 9 – 10. For scenery and sounds on the largest freshwater lake west of the Mississippi, don’t miss the Flathead Lake Blues & Music Festival in Polson August 16 – 17. Farther south, the beloved River City Roots Festival is a Western Montana favorite and Missoula’s signature event. Locals and visitors take to the streets for art, live music and family fun in the heart of this vibrant community. The event is free and takes place August 23 – 24.

KettleHouse Amphitheater hosts top-notch acts on the banks of the Blackfoot River. Photo: Logjam Presents

OUTDOOR VENUES

Western Montana boasts some of the most unique and exciting outdoor music venues in the region, offering shows through the end of September. At the KettleHouse Amphitheater in Bonner, sit along the banks of the beautiful Blackfoot River, catching a national act—like the B-52s on August 8—as boaters float by behind the stage. Another venue that pairs music with local beer, Missoula’s Big Sky Brewing Co. Amphitheater offers an impressive summer concert series lineup—The Steve Miller Band and Marty Stuart play August 17—in a big backyard-like setting. Also in Missoula, when the Osprey baseball team’s not on the field, you can catch big league concerts at the state-of-the-art Ogren Park stage. Mumford & Sons with Portugal. The Man play a sold-out show August 11—at this concert venue in the heart of Missoula on the banks of the Clark Fork River.

Arrive early! Missoula’s Symphony in the Park always draws a huge crowd. Photo: Destination Missoula

OUTDOOR SYMPHONY

Summer strings set quite the tone along the Clark Fork River at the Missoula Symphony in the Park. This free family-friendly event—in Caras Park near Dragon Hollow and A Carousel for Missoula—takes places August 18. There’s no better way to spend a Sunday evening in Missoula. Pack a picnic dinner and a blanket, and take in the classical sounds.

MUSIC AT THE FAIR

If there’s one thing you should know about Western Montana, it’s that we know how to have big, boot-stompin’ fun at a small-town fair. The Western Montana Fair in Missoula August 7 – 11 hosts multiple musicians—among a sea of cowboy hats—and all shows are free. Also don’t miss country favorite Gretchen Wilson at the Northwest Montana Fair in Kalispell August 14.

Big Sky Mudflaps play Hamilton’s Tuesday at Twelve, now in its 30th season. Photo: Russ Lawrence

RECURRING OUTDOOR CONCERTS

Weekly concerts really round out a Western Montana summer. Through August 20, catch Picnic in the Park Tuesday evenings in Kalispell with live music and food from local vendors, or spend your Tuesday lunch hour on the lawn at the Ravalli Country Museum in Hamilton for Tuesday at Twelve. Admission to both events is free. The storybook village of Bigfork hosts Riverbend Concerts on Sundays (through the end of August) at the scenic Riverbend Stage in Sliters Park. Admission is $5, and free for children 12 and under. Mountain sounds are flowing regularly out of Missoula’s Caras Park on Wednesdays at Out to Lunch, where you’ll also find plenty of local Montana flavors, and Thursdays at Downtown ToNight featuring live music, family activities, food vendors, and a beer and wine garden. Both of these events run through August. The Missoula City Band plays Wednesday evenings through August 14 in Bonner Park’s idyllic university neighborhood setting. All three Missoula events offer free admisison.

A musician shares his talent during Kalispell’s signature Picnic in the Park concert series. Photo: Discover Kalispell

Small Town Rodeos in Western Montana

The mention of Western Montana often conjures up visions of the Old West, like cowboys and horses, and with good reason—they’re a part of both our past and our present. One way we recognize that is through rodeos, which are an authentic western tradition, paying homage to our heritage with events based on the duties of actual working cowboys. Next time you’re in Glacier Country, pull on your boots, grab your cowboy hat and head to a local rodeo.

You’d be hard pressed to find a more authentic Western Montana experience. Photo: Missoula Fairgrounds

Steeped in tradition and history, many of our communities host rodeos beginning in spring and continuing through fall. Communities come together for competition, entertainment and some boot-stomping, good old-fashioned fun. Enjoy the cowboy culture and marvel at the athleticism as participants compete in challenges like calf roping, barrel racing, and bronc riding.

CALF ROPING

Calf roping, also know as tie-down roping, is an event featuring one rider mounted on a horse, and a free-roaming calf. The goal of this event is to have the shortest time lassoing the calf, dismounting the horse and tying three legs of the calf together. A similar event to this is breakaway roping, another timed competition where the rider who ropes a calf in the quickest time wins. Old-time cowboys often had to rope calves to administer medicine or to brand them, and cowboys would boast to one another about their roping skills. This soon turned into a good spirited competition in which the winner won bragging rights.

Announcers keep you entertained and updated on each competitor’s performance. Photo: Michael Rosling

BARREL RACING

The goal of this rodeo event is for a horseback rider to make a cloverleaf pattern around three barrels in the fastest time. This event combines the horsemanship skills of a rider with the natural and trained athleticism of the horse. Precision is the key to winning because if a rider or horse touches or knocks down a barrel their time is penalized. This event was originally developed for women to assist them in breaking into the rodeo scene, and is now one of the most popular events.

Competitors spend hours each week practicing for these two minutes in the arena. Photo: Josh Homer

BRONC RIDING

Originally based on the necessity of training wild horses, bronc riding is one of the wildest rodeo events and bound to get your adrenaline pumping. Bronc riding can either be bareback bronc riding or saddle bronc riding. The goal of this event is for a rider to stay on the back of an untamed horse (often bred for strength, agility and bucking ability) for eight seconds, using only one hand to hold on while the horse tries to buck him off. Half of a rider’s score is based on his or her performance, the other half on the horse’s bucking, diving and twisting.

Competitors test their grit and try to stay horseback for eight seconds. Photo: Burning Ember Photography

LIVESTOCK SHOWING

A livestock show is not a rodeo event, but often the two events are paired together. At a livestock show, pigs, cattle, sheep and other animals are judged in an arena on certain breed traits such as muscle, frame size and balance. The animals are judged, then awarded ribbons or trophies for Best of Breed, then owners have the option to sell their rated livestock. Teenagers often show livestock through clubs like FFA (Future Farmers of America) and 4-H, and children participating in these clubs can raise and show rabbits, or chickens—which are also judged.

The ideal lamb weighs between 110 and 120 lbs. Photo: Glacier Gazette

WESTERN MONTANA FAIR

Often, a rodeo will take place with a local fair. Many of our charming communities have a local fair, where you can expect games, rides and delicious fair food. Sampling the fare at the fair is not to be missed, as fair food consists of local favorites like fried cheese curds, kettle corn, elephant ears and famous vikings (a meatball on a stick, seasoned in batter and deep fried). The largest fair in Glacier Country is the Western Montana Fair in Missoula, which boasts a petting zoo, rodeo, livestock showing, art and baking competitions, monster truck show, and many rides and games.

A summer evening at the fair is a must. Photo: Missoula Fairgrounds

UPCOMING RODEOS

For more upcoming events, visit glaciermt.com/events.

Western Montana Fruitful Summers + Farmers Markets

One of many things that makes Montana special is that we have four seasons, and each season is beautiful and unique in its own right. Springtime brings blooming wildflowers and sets the stage for the harvest of summer’s distinctly Montana fruits—Flathead cherries, Dixon melons, and wild huckleberries are our favorite flavors of a Glacier Country summer. Whether you attend a festival, pick your own fruit, or stop by a local farmers market, you’d be hard pressed to find a more authentic, and tasty, Western Montana experience.

Cherry trees line the shore of Flathead Lake. Photo: Donnie Sexton

FLATHEAD CHERRIES

Some of the world’s best cherries grow right here in Montana’s Flathead Valley. The Flathead Valley offers ideal growing conditions for cherries, with warm days and cool evenings that extend the growing season, deepening the cherries in color for a sweeter taste. When driving along Flathead Lake—the largest freshwater lake west of the Mississippi—you’ll pass many cherry orchards. Pop-up fruit stands line the main roads, and it’s easy to pull over and purchase a bag of cherries. The harvest begins in late July, so plan a trip to a u-pick orchard—a fun activity for the whole family that lets you pick out the ripest and best-looking cherries. Hockaday Orchards on the west side of the lake is open 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. daily beginning late July, Getmans’ Orchard & Vineyard on the east side requires you to call ahead before stopping by. You’re likely to see other u-pick orchards with signs out welcoming you, so don’t hesitate to stop—you’ll be greeted by warm western hospitality.

You can never get enough of Flathead cherries!

Festival: The annual Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival puts on a family-friendly, mouthwatering good time that’s not to be missed. See, eat and splurge on Flathead cherries, cherry-infused treats, local artwork and handcrafted goods. Test your grit in a cherry pit-spitting contest or cherry pie eating contest. On Main Street in Polson, July 20 – 21, 2019.

Delicious Flathead cherries are a staple fruit in Western Montana.

HUCKLEBERRIES

Huckleberries are a small, dark purple, sweet berry that grow in Western Montana. This beloved berry is a real Montana prize. While visiting, you’re sure to see it infused into everything from honey and vodka to huckleberry pie topped with huckleberry ice cream. Treat yourself to this Montana taste and you’ll understand why this berry is unrivaled. While sampling the fare is sure to delight, you can also pick wild huckleberries, which grow well on slopes between 3,500 and 7,200 feet, with minimal tree coverage. However, a good huckleberry picking spot is like a good fishing hole; some secrets are best discovered on your own. Bears love huckleberries as much as we do, so it’s always a good idea to pick huckleberries in groups and carry bear spray.

These small berries pack a flavorful punch. Photo: Donnie Sexton

Festival: The Trout Creek Huckleberry Festival, located in Trout Creek, is celebrating its 40th year in 2019. More than 100 arts and crafts vendors will be selling their wares, and events include a parade, huckleberry pancake breakfast, 5k fun run, auction, horseshoe tournament, huckleberry dessert contest and much more. Food vendors offer a range of huckleberries in a variety of desserts to cap off your day. At the Trout Creek Park, August 9 – 11, 2019.

When it comes to huckleberries, the flavor combinations are endless and sure to delight. Photo: Donnie Sexton

FARMERS MARKETS

Our very popular outdoor community markets are a big part of Western Montana’s charm, and they provide the perfect opportunity to explore our lively small towns. Imagine strolling through a farmers market on a warm summer morning, coffee carts and baked goods in abundance, fresh produce, locally sourced food, and locally-made arts and crafts like pottery, paintings, jewelry, woodcarvings and more for sale. You’re likely to find our beloved huckleberries and Flathead cherries for sale here, too. Glacier Country’s market scene boast gatherings big and small, each one truly unique. Head to a farmers market for a quintessentially Western Montana experience, and take the time to talk with locals—these vendors are some of the friendliest folks around.

Farmers markets are a treasure trove full of vegetables, baked and canned goods, flowers and more.

Pro-Tip: Look for the Dixon Melon truck. The best melons in Montana are a market favorite from this vendor, serving up honeydews, crenshaws and cantaloupes right from the truck.

Savor the flavor of a delicious Dixon melon. Photo: Destination Missoula

GLACIER COUNTRY 2019 FARMERS MARKETS:

Tuesdays: Darby, Missoula, Whitefish

Wednesdays: Bigfork, Arlee, Cut Bank, Trout Creek

Thursdays: Alberton, Columbia Falls, Libby, Eureka (second Thursday of the month)

Fridays: Plains, Polson, West Glacier

Saturdays: Troy, Florence, Hamilton, Kalispell, Missoula, Noxon, Stevensville, Superior

Sundays: Florence, Seeley Lake

Hidden Gem Golf Courses in Western Montana

With wide-open vistas and room to roam, it should come as no surprise that Western Montana’s Glacier Country is a golfer’s paradise. Come spring, we gleefully trade our ski poles for golf clubs. Here, we have the perfect blend of breathtaking landscapes, renowned courses and affordability. Pair that combo with small-town charm, and teeing up in Montana is a real treat. Get on the green in Glacier Country, where you’ll find some of the most stunning and enjoyable golf experiences, and get to know our scenic travel corridors while you’re at it.

Sunset bathes hole 12 of the Nick Faldo-designed course at the Wilderness Club. Photo: Wilderness Club

NORTHWEST CORRIDOR

Along Montana’s quiet Northwest Corridor, you’ll find three courses all offering something special. Eureka may be small but it boasts not one, but two golf hot spots. At Indian Springs Ranch play the links-style, 18-hole championship course that’s pure fun. Bask in the beauty of the Tobacco Valley at this unique, master-planned recreational community. Also in Eureka, the stunning Wilderness Club—designed by golf legend Nick Faldo—was ranked the No. 1 golf course in Montana by Golfweek and Golf Magazine and the No. 2 Best New Private Golf Course in the U.S. by Golf Magazine. In Libby, the aptly named Cabinet View Golf Club offers just that—a great game of golf among gorgeous Cabinet Mountain views.

BITTERROOT VALLEY

The beautiful Bitterroot Valley beckons all year long, but any season you can swing a golf club here is extra special. The unique Whitetail Golf Course in Stevensville is located within the Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, so it’s the perfect place to find an authentic Montana golfing experience…and spot some wildlife on the green. Further down U.S. Highway 93 in Hamilton, the Hamilton Golf Course offers a fabulous round of golf and some of the best views in the valley.

Playing the 14th hole at Meadow Lake Golf Resort. Photo: Meadow Lake Golf Resort, Inc.

GLACIER NATIONAL PARK SURROUNDING AREA + EAST GLACIER CORRIDOR

If your trip to Glacier National Park isn’t complete without a round of golf (we don’t blame you), here are four places in and around the park to swing your clubs. Meadow Lake Golf Resort in Columbia Falls is a must-play, and Golf Magazine agrees. Golf Digest gives this treasured course 4.5 stars and named it one of the top four public courses in Montana. Within the park itself, Glacier View Golf Course in West Glacier blends natural beauty with a polished game of golf. Along the East Glacier Travel Corridor in East Glacier Park, tee up at Glacier Park Lodge Golf Course. This historic course on the Blackfeet Reservation is the oldest grass greens golf course in Montana, and all 9 holes are named for former Blackfeet chiefs. At the Cut Bank Golf and Country Club a mile west of Cut Bank, enjoy small-town golf at its finest with an exceptional game and down-to-earth vibes.

TOUR 200

The laid-back Wild Horse Plains Golf Course in Plains is a family favorite along Montana’s scenic Tour 200 just north of Paradise. From there, drive the length of this scenic byway and end up in the quaint town of Thompson Falls for another round at Rivers Bend Golf Course, where every third hole finds you back at the clubhouse.

The Mission Mountain Golf Club offers gorgeous views of its namesake. Photo: Mission Mountain Golf Club

FLATHEAD CORRIDOR

The Flathead Valley has been named a “Top 50 Golf Course Destination” by Golf Digest. There’s no denying the beauty of the region and the caliber of its courses. At the southern tip of Flathead Lake—the largest freshwater lake west of the Mississippi—the Polson Bay Golf Course in Polson offers beautiful mountain views and fairways adjacent to the lake. South of that, in Pablo, the 9-hole executive Silver Fox Golf Course winds its way through lush trees, serene ponds and a wildlife corridor on the Salish Kootenai College campus. Even farther south, take in exceptional Mission Mountain views and a challenging game of golf at the Mission Mountain Golf Club in Ronan.

I-90 CORRIDOR

Experience good old-fashioned Montana hospitality 10 miles west of Missoula at King Ranch Golf Course in Frenchtown, where you’ll find 18 holes on wide fairways along the scenic Clark Fork River. Another I-90 Corridor favorite along the Clark Fork, and one of Western Montana’s hidden gems, is Trestle Creek Golf Course in St. Regis—known for some of the finest greens.

The Double Arrow Lodge features a spectacular golf course plus lodging and dining in Seeley Lake.

SEELEY-SWAN CORRIDOR

The recreation opportunities in the Seeley-Swan Corridor are some of Montana’s best, and golf is no exception. In the storybook village of Bigfork on the north shore of Flathead Lake, the semi-private Eagle Bend Golf Club offers a championship 27-hole course. In Seeley Lake, the pristine ponderosa pine setting of the Double Arrow Golf Course offers resort golfing nestled between the Swan and Mission mountain ranges. Watch wildlife as you make your way around water features and bunkers, and don’t miss the No. 15 signature hole, featuring an elevated tee and island green.

The list goes on—Western Montana is dotted with golf courses, from small-town favorites to large championship and semi-private golf clubs and resorts. Go green under our famous blue sky. For more inspiration, visit the Northwest Montana Golf Association, and read more about Glacier Country’s larger golf courses here.

Added Bonus: In addition to stunning scenery and incredible terrain, golfing in Western Montana won’t break the bank; it’s part of the warm western hospitality we’re known for.

7 Mountain Bike Trails to Explore in Glacier Country

Mountain biking Glacier Country’s extensive trail systems is the perfect way to cover epic ground while breathing in fresh mountain air. Shred a single-track mountain biking trail or visit our family-friendly ski resorts turned downhill mountain bike resorts. There’s no shortage of terrain to pedal; miles of trail systems crisscross the region, and there’s something for every skill level. Explore Western Montana on two wheels. Here are a handful of our favorite trails.

Elevate your mountain biking adventure in Glacier Country.

WHITEFISH MOUNTAIN RESORT – WHITEFISH 

Level: Children and Beginners – Advanced

Whitefish Mountain Resort, located 8 miles north of the quintessential mountain town of Whitefish is a mecca of meandering trails. Ski mountains provide some of the best terrain for mountain biking and family fun for riders of every skill level, and Whitefish has it down to an art. At Strider Bike Park aspiring young mountain bikers, ages 2 – 6, practice their riding skills on pedal-less bikes. A bike school is offered for first-timers, while skilled riders can explore 30-plus miles of chair lift-accessed cross-country mountain bike trails. Unbeatable panoramic views of the Flathead Valley can be taken in from the top. Bike rentals are available on site. Whitefish Mountain Resort opens for summer activities May 25, 2019 (weather dependent).

Round Trip Distance: Varies

Western Montana’s alpine forests wait to be explored. Photo: Whitefish Bike Retreat

WHITEFISH BIKE RETREAT AND BEAVER LAKE TRAIL – WHITEFISH

Level: Beginners – Intermediate  

Eight miles west of Whitefish is the Whitefish Bike Retreat, the perfect place to begin your biking adventure. Make it an overnight—trail-side lodging and on-site bike rentals let you sleep, wake and ride. Warm up for the day by taking a lap on the short loop circling the 19-acre property, navigate berms on the pump track or weave through obstacles in the skills park. When you’re ready to explore more, the Whitefish Bike Retreat connects directly to The Whitefish Trail, serving up more than 42 miles of single-track trails. The Beaver Lake Trailhead, located next to the retreat, is a short but fun 3-mile loop. Choose to turn back, or keep exploring The Whitefish Trail system.

Round Trip Distance: 3.5 miles

Take in panoramic views of the Missoula Valley at Montana Snowbowl. Photo: Montana Snowbowl

MONTANA SNOWBOWL – MISSOULA

Level: Intermediate – Advanced

Montana Snowbowl, located minutes from downtown Missoula, is a local’s favorite ski mountain in the winter and a mountain bike enthusiast’s dream during the summer. Ride the Grizzly Chairlift to 7,000 feet, taking in the sheer beauty of Lolo National Forest with breathtaking views of sweeping meadows and alpine forests. Challenge yourself to bike to the top of Point Six Trail, an elevation gain of 926 feet, and try to beat the record of 37 minutes, 36 seconds. After a hard but brief push to the top, enjoy mostly downhill trails on the other 25 miles of trail systems, then ride the chairlift back up and do it all again. Cap off the day with a post-adventure bloody mary and delicious wood-fired pizza. Montana Snowbowl opens for summer activities in late June.

Round Trip Distance: Varies

BLUE MOUNTAIN – MISSOULA

Level: Intermediate

Directions: After exploring Missoula—the arts and culture hub of Western Montana—head south for 2 miles on U.S. Highway 93. Turn right onto Blue Mountain Road and the trailhead is on the left where the road makes a 90-degree turn. This popular recreation area boasts more than 41 miles of trails, so be sure to pick up a map. You’ll begin your ride in open meadows, where you can enjoy views of the Missoula Valley and Sapphire and Rattlesnake mountains, before you ascend into forested wilderness. Ride a quick and easy 3-mile loop, or explore much farther.

Round Trip Distance: Varies

Ride to Paradise on the Clark Fork River Trail. Photo: Vo von Sehlen

CLARK FORK RIVER TRAIL – ST. REGIS

Level: Intermediate

Directions: From St. Regis, travel east 11 miles on State Highway 135. The trailhead is at the Ferry Landing fishing access, located on the north side of the highway. The Clark Fork River Trail takes you through Lolo National Forest along the Clark Fork River between Paradise and St. Regis. It’s a smooth single-track trail that winds along lush old-growth forest and sweeping wildflower meadows. The first switchback climbs are the most difficult, but push through them because this ride is well worth it.

Round Trip Distance: 18 miles

There’s plenty of fun to be had at Lake Como.

LAKE COMO TRAIL – DARBY

Level: Intermediate/Advanced

Directions: After experiencing the Old West charm of Darby, travel north for 4 miles on US-93 then turn left on Lake Como Road. Follow it for 3 miles until you meet the campground and trailhead on your right. Lake Como Trail is a relatively flat yet technically difficult trail. Discover beauty around every bend as you circle Lake Como, pass by a waterfall and take in the dramatic mountain setting. This is a popular hiking trail in the summer and it’s a bit narrow, so spring is the perfect time to ride it.

Round Trip Distance: 8 miles

BUTTERCUP LOOP – HAMILTON

Level: Intermediate – Advanced

Directions: From Hamilton, turn south onto US-93 for 2.8 miles before turning left on State Highway 38 heading east. After 0.7 miles, turn right onto Sleeping Child Road and continue for 4 miles until you reach the junction of Little Sleeping Child Road. Park at the junction where you’ll often see vehicles of fellow bikers, but there is no designated parking lot. This is the beginning of the Buttercup Loop trail. The first 7 miles of the ride are on Sleeping Child Road, but views of the canyon make the short road-riding portion well worth it. You’ll start climbing on Black Tail Road and wind through woodland terrain until it opens up to meadows popping with color. After a bit of a difficult climb, the fresh mountain air and unrivaled views of the Bitterroot Valley are worth it before coasting back down to the car. Go the distance on this loop and you won’t be disappointed.

Round Trip Distance: 21.1 miles

The Crown of the Continent beckons cyclers.

BONUS: GOING-TO-THE-SUN ROAD – GLACIER NATIONAL PARK

Level: Intermediate Road Biking

You won’t want to miss the opportunity to bike the Going-to-the-Sun Road—an engineering marvel and National Historic Landmark—before the road is fully open to cars. In the spring, hikers and bikers are given first access, and biking one of America’s most scenic roads is a pretty epic way to see spring flourish in Glacier National Park. Take in jaw-dropping views of glacial-carved terrain.

Round Trip Distance: Varies. Check road status here.

Pro-Tip: Catch a shuttle on the weekends between Apgar Visitor Center and Avalanche Creek. Shuttle service begins mid-May and operates until the road is fully open to vehicles. Or, do a guided trip with our friends at Glacier Guides, who provide shuttle, bike rental, helmet and lunch.

GEAR UP

  1. Spring weather is unpredictable. Dress in layers and bring a rain jacket. Wear worn-in and comfortable biking shoes.
  2. It’s important to stay safe in the sometimes remote Western Montana wilderness. Wear a helmet.
  3. Pack a light backpack with water, snacks, a map and a tire pump.
  4. Carry bear spray with you—you never know what wildlife you’ll encounter.

Helpful trail maps can be found at local visitor centers, ranger stations and forest service offices. Bike rentals are available throughout the region.

Top 10 Brunch Spots in Western Montana

During the everchanging seasons in Western Montana outdoor adventures abound. Weekends are filled with epic lake days, Nordic excursions, biking and more. After all this recreating, you may need a rest. We get it—some days are meant for cozy clothes and relaxing with friends and family. Here are the top 10 brunch spots we’re digging in Glacier Country, for days when the only reason to get off the couch is to find food.

You’ll be hard pressed to find a more authentic Montana brunch than The Trough. Photo: The Trough

THE TROUGH

Make Missoula a priority when planning your trip to Glacier Country—the food scene is one you won’t want to miss. One of our favorite undiscovered brunch spots is The Trough. In the more rural part of town, this spot used to be a working dairy, hence the name of the adjacent market—The Olde Dairy. This newer restaurant has taken Missoula by storm, the food is worth bragging about and the experience is authentically Montana. Get a breakfast sandwich your way or try the Farmer’s Skillet.

Our mouths are officially watering. Photo: Burns St. Bistro

BURNS ST. BISTRO

Creative recipes with mouthwatering dishes resulted in a following of “Bistronauts” for Burns St. Bistro. Not surprisingly, in 2017 locals voted it Best Brunch in Missoula. Themed brunches take the spotlight Saturday and Sunday—like the Star Trek Brunch or the Cheese Brunch. Monday – Friday grab breakfast, lunch or dinner; the everchanging menu makes this eatery one we never tire of. It’s hard to know what will be on the menu when you go, but we do know it will be delicious.

Kick back with a Bloody Mary at Tamarack Brewing Company in Missoula. Photo: Tamarack Brewing Company

TAMARACK BREWING COMPANY

When in Missoula, another local’s favorite is Tamarack Brewing Company. The build-your-own Bloody Mary bar has everything you could dream of putting in your drink—bacon, asparagus, pickles and more. Once you have this staple of a good brunch secured, we recommend trying the chicken and waffles or biscuits and gravy. Open for brunch on weekends.

Start your morning off right with a pour-over coffee. Photo: Caffè Dolce

CAFFÈ DOLCE

In the Missoula slant streets area hides a popular neighborhood hot spot, Caffè Dolce. With Italian fresco paintings donning the ceiling, this vibrant restaurant has carefully crafted a brunch menu that will delight your palate. To bring your brunch game to the next level, try their meticulously created pour-over coffee paired with their seasonally changing scramble of the day. Brunch is on Sundays; breakfast, lunch and dinner are available Monday – Saturday.

The Monte Cristo sandwich will leave a smile on your face. Photo: Starrett Artists

MISSION BISTRO

Mission Bistro in historic Stevensville sits on Main Street immersed in Old West charm. This quaint bistro serves up hearty meals with immense flavors, such as the wild mushroom and bacon scramble or the Monte Cristo sandwich. Open Sundays for brunch.

Montana meets France at a Taste of Paris. Photo: Taste of Paris

TASTE OF PARIS

Nestled at the base of the Bitterroot Mountains in Hamilton, you’ll find Taste of Paris. They’re known for fabulous crepes, served with an array of topping options like lemon juice with sugar or poached pears, chocolate sauce and Chantilly cream. Save room for dessert—pastries are made fresh daily. Open Sundays for brunch.

POCKETSTONE CAFE

In the storybook village of Bigfork, Pocketstone Cafe lays on the charm. Homestyle cooking is their specialty, and the omelets hold a special place in our hearts. If the food doesn’t make you smile, the menu will; picking out your brunch is an experience in itself. A cinnamon roll the size of your head is a must, and, as the menu reads, “These are really good, really big and really homemade.”

This twist on a classic eggs Benedict will keep you coming back for more. Photo: Swift Creek Cafe

SWIFT CREEK CAFE

If you’re venturing to the quintessential mountain town of Whitefish, be sure to stop at Swift Creek Cafe, which is open for breakfast and lunch seven days a week, and brunch on Sundays. The owners, a father and son team, have a passion for food that is evident in their diverse dishes—the Braised Duck Benedict is a favorite of ours.

The Smoked Salmon Croque will keep you coming back again and again. Photo: The Boat Club

THE BOAT CLUB

The Boat Club at The Lodge at Whitefish Lake is the perfect place to savor exquisite Montana food. Try the Smoked Salmon Croque Madame, a croissant filled with salmon, spinach, avocado and cheese, topped with béchamel and a fried egg; it’s amazing. Pair brunch with a signature Apple Cider Mimosa for the complete dining experience. Brunch is served on Saturdays and Sundays.

Quintessential brunch food can be found at The Knead Cafe. Photo: The Knead Cafe

THE KNEAD CAFE

Get your farm-to-table fix at The Knead Cafe in Kalispell. On the menu you’ll find classics like eggs Benedict and vegetarian-friendly options such as a veggie frittata. For those looking for a sweeter option, try the pecan-crusted pancakes. Serving up warm western hospitality Monday – Saturday.

Show Stopping Performing Arts in Western Montana

Nature isn’t the only thing putting on a spectacular show in Western Montana’s Glacier Country. Talented performing artists flock to the region, inspired by the sheer beauty and wide-open landscape for artistic expression. Long-running theater companies and symphony orchestras have staged captivating performances here for decades. From community plays to Broadway-caliber theater to live concerts, Western Montana boasts a critically acclaimed performing arts scene.

Soaking up soul-inspiring music and skies at Glacier Symphony’s Summer Pops Concert. Photo: Michael Roessman

The Flathead Valley touts a pretty impressive commitment to the arts. One of the region’s most renowned theater companies, the Bigfork Summer Playhouse, performs “Broadway in the Rockies” every summer. This storybook village on Flathead Lake has been wowing audiences for 60 years with many talented performers—like J.K. Simmons of Whiplash and Spider-Man fame—gracing the stage at the local playhouse. From a beautiful 1938 log theater on the south end of the lake, Port Polson Players has long been committed to community, children’s and summer theater with a captivating lineup of shows. In nearby Whitefish, the Alpine Theatre Project, founded by three Broadway veterans, brings Broadway to this charming mountain town, no doubt helping this community claim its spot as “One of the Top 10 Coolest Small Towns in America.” Kalispell’s Glacier Symphony Orchestra and Chorale offers live symphonic music concerts year-round including summer chamber series, outdoor pops and the Festival Amadeus.

Alpine Theatre Project’s productions draw top talent like Broadway star N’Kenge. Photo: Brenda Ahearn

Another breathtakingly beautiful Western Montana valley—the Bitterroot—holds its own with the Hamilton Players, spotlighting the importance of education and community through theater, and the Stevensville Playhouse, offering a springtime lineup in a theater with quite the storied past, including being destroyed twice by fire.

Bigfork Summer Playhouse presents musicals from July – September. Photo: Brach Thomson, “Into the Woods”

As the arts and culture hub of Glacier Country, Missoula packs a big punch in the performing arts realm. The year-round Missoula Community Theater presents five main-stage productions each season and the Missoula Children’s Theater—the nation’s largest touring children’s theater—tours 1,200 communities in all 50 states and Canada, plus schools and U.S. military bases in more than 15 countries.

Hamilton Players prove that small-town theaters can put on big-time shows like “Chicago.” Photo: Tom Brader

The artistically ambitious independent BetweenTheLines Theatre stages raw, contemporary performances at Missoula’s historic Roxy Theater. With a focus on celebrating the human spirit, the Montana Repertory Theatre at the University of Montana is one of the most respected touring companies in the country. You can catch an MRT performance at the Masquer Theatre on the UM campus during their short Missoula summer season, and they also host a Plays on Tap series where you can watch a “site-based theater for small audiences” performance one to two times a year at locations in Missoula, such as a local brewery or taproom. The UM’s School of Theatre & Dance also performs throughout the year. Enjoy an evening of dance at their popular annual Dance in Concert celebrating the captivating and finely crafted choreographic work of students, faculty and guest artists. Check the UM box office for performing arts schedules and tickets.

Missoula’s streets doubled as the set for Montana Repertory Theatre’s “Buckle Up.” Photo: Justin Philalack

Experience the Missoula Symphony Orchestra at Caras Park in downtown Missoula each summer during their local’s favorite Symphony in the Park, or one of their six concerts throughout the year, including a show created specifically for kids. It’s a great way to experience the tight-knit community vibes Missoula is known for and the big talent coming out of small-town Montana.

Delight in a sophisticated performance by the Missoula Symphony. Photo: Jonathan Qualben Photography

Budget Friendly Girls Getaways in Glacier Country

With countless ways to recreate, from golf to yoga and biking to fly-fishing, Western Montana sets the scene for an epic girls getaway—without breaking the bank. Our awe-inspiring views create the perfect backdrop to relax, reconnect and rejuvenate with friends. Set aside time to explore one of our vibrant (and quite charming) downtowns where you will be greeted with warm western hospitality. Here’s your guide to an authentic small-town adventure and instagram-worthy retreats in Glacier Country.

Create unforgettable memories together at Dancing Spirit Ranch. Photo: Dancing Spirit Ranch

ADVENTUROUS GETAWAYS

Just outside Glacier National Park, Dancing Spirit Ranch provides year-round yoga retreats. Reach peaceful serenity by practicing yoga outside in the unmatched scenery of the Flathead Valley. The Ladies Summer Camp, May 30 – June 2, 2019, combines invigorating and restorative yoga with meditation, leaving you in a blissful state. The camp is rounded out with daily activities like stand-up paddleboarding and hikes in Glacier National Park, plus nightly campfires.

Explore Glacier Country on two wheels.

You would be hard-pressed to find a more authentic Glacier Country adventure than Whitefish Bike Retreat. This unique destination located outside of Whitefish calls to you and your bike-loving friends. The resort has a single-lap trail around the property and a skills area with jumps and obstacles for all levels of rider, and also offers accommodations so you can sleep-wake-ride. The property leads to The Whitefish Trail network, which encompasses 42+ miles of trails with loops, scenic overlooks, logging roads and natural-surface trails to ride. In the winter, try fat biking—an increasingly popular and wildly fun activity. The oversized tires on fat bikes make it easy to move across the snow. Rentals are available on-site at Whitefish Bike Retreat.

Soak in natural mineral waters at Quinn’s Hot Springs Resort.

One of our favorite ways to unwind is to soak in the warm mineral waters at Quinn’s Hot Springs Resort located outside of Paradise. If you are searching for a low-key girls weekend, look no further. Mineral pools have long been thought to offer health benefits, and the pools at Quinn’s are 100 percent natural. Temperatures range from a steamy 106 degrees to a cool and mellow 89 degrees. Overlooking the Clark Fork River, it’s the perfect place to relax and stay awhile, with two lodges, 25 beautiful log cabins, a restaurant and a tavern all on location. Plan to stay during their High Country Cowboys Dinner Show March 18, 2019 or May 6, 2019, to enjoy live western music and fine dining after a rejuvenating soak.

Head to Double Arrow Resort for a round (or many) of golf, and you won’t be disappointed.

In Western Montana springtime means swing time. Challenge your friends on the golf course at Double Arrow Resort, near Seeley Lake. It’s a true golfer’s paradise with breathtaking views of the Swan and Mission mountain ranges, and you’re bound to catch a glimpse of some wildlife on the sidelines. The 6,500-yard course is woven through the landscape truly immersing you in its beauty. Each hole of this scenic course is staged with three sets of tees; choose one based on your skill level. Top off the day with a glass of award-winning wine and classic country cuisine at Seasons Restaurant in the historic main lodge, then get cozy in one of the rustic or new spacious cabins and settle in. Don’t miss the Spring Stay & Play Golf Package available through June 8, 2019.

Try all the different brews by ordering a flight.

EXPLORING WESTERN MONTANA’S TOWNS

Missoula—the cultural hub of Glacier Country—is one town that bustles year-round. It boasts a fast-growing live music scene, museums, art galleries, plus food options from fine dining to cafés and everything in between. With 11 breweries, three distilleries, two wineries and a cidery, it’s not a stretch to say your squad could spend the whole weekend enjoying the eateries and spirits. Stay at the Gibson Mansion Bed and Breakfast, where Victorian elegance meets modern convenience. For a more central stay, the Holiday Inn Missoula Downtown, in the heart of Missoula, is a short walk from many of the best shops and galleries.

Cast a line in Western Montana.

Anchoring the Bitterroot Valley is Hamilton, the valley’s largest community. This explore-worthy town offers something for everyone in your group, with theater, live music, local breweries and eclectic downtown shops. For a look at Hamilton’s history, tour the historic Daly Mansion, the 24,000 square foot home of copper baron Marcus Daly. The Bitterroot River, a short drive away, is an angler’s paradise known for phenomenal fishing. The Cabins at Deer Crossing offer a rustic retreat; choose between the Homestead Cabin and the Montana Cabin, or stay at the Big Sky Suite in the main lodge. Steps away from downtown, The Historic Wesley Building can be rented on VRBO. With a wraparound porch and conservatory, this house lays on the charm.

GETTING HERE

With two major international airports—Missoula (MSO) and Glacier Park (FCA)—serviced by Allegiant Air, Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Airlines, Frontier Airlines and United Airlines, there are plenty of routes to provide smooth travel plans for visiting Western Montana.

Direct flights regularly arrive from Dallas-Fort Worth, Denver, Las Vegas, Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Phoenix-Mesa, Portland, Salt Lake City and Seattle-Tacoma. Seasonal flights arrive from Atlanta, Chicago O’Hare, Los Angeles, Oakland and San Francisco. In addition to air travel, you can get here by train on Amtrak’s Empire Builder or drive in on our very scenic highway system.

Holiday Charm in Western Montana

Winter in Western Montana’s Glacier Country is pure magic; we really know how to deck the halls and celebrate the season of giving with all things merry and bright. It’s also true that winter’s the time of year when it’s pretty easy to get a little stir crazy, which is why we fill the season with holiday events and celebrations galore.

Deck the halls! Bigfork, Montana shows off its western holiday spirit. Photo: Bigfork Chamber of Commerce

HOLIDAY STROLLS AND PARADES OF LIGHT

You would be hard-pressed to find a more authentic Western Montana evening than a Christmas stroll. Wander the streets and enjoy the perfect combination of wagon rides, chestnut roasting and vendors selling Montana-made goods and artisan crafts. The holiday celebration doesn’t end there. Experience the splendor of a Parade of Light and prepare to be swept up in the magic of the holidays. Sightings include Santa, reindeer and floats adorned in lights galore.

Glacier Country gives family time a whole new meaning. Photo: Chelsea Culp

HOLIDAY CHEER AT THE THEATER

If you are ready to cozy up inside for a unique and unforgettable winter experience you will be pleasantly surprised to find out that the state’s rugged exterior belies a highly developed artistic sensibility. Musicals, symphony concerts, ballets and more dot the region during the holiday season and are a Western Montana specialty. Attend the timeless performance of “The Nutcracker Ballet” (University of Montana’s Adams Center), enjoy a buttered popcorn and a soda or adult beverage while watching classics like “It’s a Wonderful Life” (Roxy Theater), or listen to This Sacred Season and “Messiah” with the Glacier Symphony (Whitefish Performing Arts Center). Here are many ways you can add a splash of culture to the holiday season.

The grace and tradition of Missoula’s Nutcracker performance will be the highlight of your holiday season. Photo: Garden City Ballet – Neil Chaput de Saintonge

HOLIDAY BAZAAR

One of the things Western Montana does best is put on a good holiday bazaar. Embrace the spirit of giving this season with gifts from locally sourced and canned foods, hand-crafted jewelry, pottery, woodworking, handmade soaps and other Montana artisan goods and wares. While you’re browsing, be sure to enjoy a cup of cocoa and mingle with the locals—we’re known for being some of the friendliest folks around.

So many different and amazing choices for children and adults alike. Photo: HandMADE Montana -Carol Lynn Lapotka

NEW YEAR’S EVE

Glacier Country Montana is always ready to make your trip memorable, but there is a special atmosphere around New Year’s Eve. Whether you are looking for a night out dancing, a fireworks send-off under the vast night sky, or a low-key night downtown without the big-city crowds—we’ve got the best place to close out the holidays and make your 2019 resolutions.

Send off 2018 with a bang. Photo: Flathead Beacon – Lido Vizzutti

MUST-STOP TOWNS BURSTING WITH HOLIDAY CHARM

Bigfork: Located on the bay of Flathead Lake, the storybook town of Bigfork gets a little magical around the holidays. The community “elves” come together every year to adorn the town with wreaths, ribbon, garland and lights, creating authentic Western Montana holiday charm.

Whitefish: The quintessential mountain resort town of Whitefish goes all out creating an enchanting winter wonderland. A stroll through downtown will yield bells, wreaths, boughs and lights ornamenting each business and weaving through the streets.

Ovando: Another stop-worthy town is Ovando. This quaint (and beyond adorable) town lays on the charm for the holiday season. Downtown, the 100-year-old buildings create the atmosphere of an authentic Old West holiday.

Not many places celebrate the holidays like Whitefish, Montana. Photo: Brian Schott

You can also check out a full listing of holiday events at glaciermt.com/events.