Category Archives: Outdoor Fun

Budget Friendly Girls Getaways in Glacier Country

With countless ways to recreate, from golf to yoga and biking to fly-fishing, Western Montana sets the scene for an epic girls getaway—without breaking the bank. Our awe-inspiring views create the perfect backdrop to relax, reconnect and rejuvenate with friends. Set aside time to explore one of our vibrant (and quite charming) downtowns where you will be greeted with warm western hospitality. Here’s your guide to an authentic small-town adventure and instagram-worthy retreats in Glacier Country.

Create unforgettable memories together at Dancing Spirit Ranch. Photo: Dancing Spirit Ranch

ADVENTUROUS GETAWAYS

Just outside Glacier National Park, Dancing Spirit Ranch provides year-round yoga retreats. Reach peaceful serenity by practicing yoga outside in the unmatched scenery of the Flathead Valley. The Ladies Summer Camp, May 30 – June 2, 2019, combines invigorating and restorative yoga with meditation, leaving you in a blissful state. The camp is rounded out with daily activities like stand-up paddleboarding and hikes in Glacier National Park, plus nightly campfires.

Explore Glacier Country on two wheels.

You would be hard-pressed to find a more authentic Glacier Country adventure than Whitefish Bike Retreat. This unique destination located outside of Whitefish calls to you and your bike-loving friends. The resort has a single-lap trail around the property and a skills area with jumps and obstacles for all levels of rider, and also offers accommodations so you can sleep-wake-ride. The property leads to The Whitefish Trail network, which encompasses 42+ miles of trails with loops, scenic overlooks, logging roads and natural-surface trails to ride. In the winter, try fat biking—an increasingly popular and wildly fun activity. The oversized tires on fat bikes make it easy to move across the snow. Rentals are available on-site at Whitefish Bike Retreat.

Soak in natural mineral waters at Quinn’s Hot Springs Resort.

One of our favorite ways to unwind is to soak in the warm mineral waters at Quinn’s Hot Springs Resort located outside of Paradise. If you are searching for a low-key girls weekend, look no further. Mineral pools have long been thought to offer health benefits, and the pools at Quinn’s are 100 percent natural. Temperatures range from a steamy 106 degrees to a cool and mellow 89 degrees. Overlooking the Clark Fork River, it’s the perfect place to relax and stay awhile, with two lodges, 25 beautiful log cabins, a restaurant and a tavern all on location. Plan to stay during their High Country Cowboys Dinner Show March 18, 2019 or May 6, 2019, to enjoy live western music and fine dining after a rejuvenating soak.

Head to Double Arrow Resort for a round (or many) of golf, and you won’t be disappointed.

In Western Montana springtime means swing time. Challenge your friends on the golf course at Double Arrow Resort, near Seeley Lake. It’s a true golfer’s paradise with breathtaking views of the Swan and Mission mountain ranges, and you’re bound to catch a glimpse of some wildlife on the sidelines. The 6,500-yard course is woven through the landscape truly immersing you in its beauty. Each hole of this scenic course is staged with three sets of tees; choose one based on your skill level. Top off the day with a glass of award-winning wine and classic country cuisine at Seasons Restaurant in the historic main lodge, then get cozy in one of the rustic or new spacious cabins and settle in. Don’t miss the Spring Stay & Play Golf Package available through June 8, 2019.

Try all the different brews by ordering a flight.

EXPLORING WESTERN MONTANA’S TOWNS

Missoula—the cultural hub of Glacier Country—is one town that bustles year-round. It boasts a fast-growing live music scene, museums, art galleries, plus food options from fine dining to cafés and everything in between. With 11 breweries, three distilleries, two wineries and a cidery, it’s not a stretch to say your squad could spend the whole weekend enjoying the eateries and spirits. Stay at the Gibson Mansion Bed and Breakfast, where Victorian elegance meets modern convenience. For a more central stay, the Holiday Inn Missoula Downtown, in the heart of Missoula, is a short walk from many of the best shops and galleries.

Cast a line in Western Montana.

Anchoring the Bitterroot Valley is Hamilton, the valley’s largest community. This explore-worthy town offers something for everyone in your group, with theater, live music, local breweries and eclectic downtown shops. For a look at Hamilton’s history, tour the historic Daly Mansion, the 24,000 square foot home of copper baron Marcus Daly. The Bitterroot River, a short drive away, is an angler’s paradise known for phenomenal fishing. The Cabins at Deer Crossing offer a rustic retreat; choose between the Homestead Cabin and the Montana Cabin, or stay at the Big Sky Suite in the main lodge. Steps away from downtown, The Historic Wesley Building can be rented on VRBO. With a wraparound porch and conservatory, this house lays on the charm.

GETTING HERE

With two major international airports—Missoula (MSO) and Glacier Park (FCA)—serviced by Allegiant Air, Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Airlines, Frontier Airlines and United Airlines, there are plenty of routes to provide smooth travel plans for visiting Western Montana.

Direct flights regularly arrive from Dallas-Fort Worth, Denver, Las Vegas, Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Phoenix-Mesa, Portland, Salt Lake City and Seattle-Tacoma. Seasonal flights arrive from Atlanta, Chicago O’Hare, Los Angeles, Oakland and San Francisco. In addition to air travel, you can get here by train on Amtrak’s Empire Builder or drive in on our very scenic highway system.

A Nordic Adventure Along the Blackfoot River Scenic Corridor

It’s impossible to hit the road in Western Montana and not find adventure. Every one of our highways, scenic routes and backroads leads to discovery, and the stretch of State Highway 200 from Bonner to Ovando is no exception. Traveling along the Blackfoot River offers quintessential picturesque Montana moments. In the summer the river is full of boaters, floaters and anglers, but during the winter the Blackfoot Corridor offers incredible off-river recreation opportunities.

Snow-dappled evergreens make a marvelous backdrop for a day of cross-country skiing in Lubrecht Forest.

One of the charming communities along the Blackfoot Corridor, Greenough makes for an exceptionally fun day trip from Missoula. Head out to the Lubrecht Experimental Forest for some cross-country skiing. The forest serves as an “outdoor classroom” for research students from the University of Montana and a recreation retreat for the public. It offers a serene Nordic skiing adventure when the snow flies, with twelve miles of maintained cross-country classic and skate ski trails.

Lubrecht has a variety of trails for all cross-country skier skill levels.

Easy-to-read trail maps are available at the trailhead, and, whether you’re a beginner or seasoned skier, it’s an amazing place to get out, breathe the fresh mountain air and experience the natural beauty of the region. Trail C offers “classic style” cross-country skiing and a serene forest landscape. Along the trail, you’ll be passed by fellow skiers offering a friendly hello, which is exactly what you can expect here in Glacier Country—warm welcomes. For a rustic overnight adventure, Lubrecht has a small lodge, cabins and boxcars available.

A day well spent in Glacier Country with friends, snow and amazing trails.

Just south of Greenough you’ll find Garnet Ghost Town. If you’re on a snowmobile or packing a set of skis or snowshoes, you’re in luck, as those are the only ways you can access Garnet when it’s covered in snow, which is one of the most magical times to experience this once-thriving abandoned mining town.

We think winter looks pretty good on you, Greenough.

After all the winter wonderland fun, it’s time to celebrate a day well spent. Stop in at the Kettlehouse Brewery in Bonner to cap off your Blackfoot Corridor adventure with an award-winning Cold Smoke® Scotch Ale.

 

Big Fun at Small-Town Ski Hills in Western Montana

We continue to live up to our nickname here in the Treasure State. Montana is chock-full of hidden gems, and when it comes to adventure, Glacier Country is a treasure trove of discovery. One of our best-kept secrets is our handful of small-town ski hills, where fresh powder delivers and local vibes prevail. What you won’t find on these hills? Crowds, high-priced lift tickets and long lift lines.

Skiers delight in the impeccably groomed trails at Lookout Pass. Photo: Lookout Pass Ski & Recreation Area

Here’s the inside scoop on where to find some of the country’s best undiscovered skiing and snowboarding.

Discovery Ski Area is a true local’s hangout, offering beautiful views and the perfect combination of uncrowded slopes, tree skiing, expert bowl skiing, groomed trails and mogul runs. You’ll find some of the steepest lift-served terrain in the region here, while the variety of beginner and intermediate runs call to all abilities. Discovery—known locally as “Disco”—is a must-experience for anyone, and the lodge’s famous shortbread chocolate chip cookies alone are worth the visit. National Geographic magazine featured Philipsburg in a 2013 write-up of the Best Secret Ski Towns of North America that “deliver some of the most unspoiled skiing North America has to offer.” Downhill Detail: 2,200 acres + 67 runs + 2,388 ft. vertical drop.

Lookout Pass receives epic amounts of snowfall. Photo: Lookout Pass Ski & Recreation Area

Straddling the Montana/Idaho border west of Missoula, Lookout Pass sees the heaviest snowfall in Western Montana at 400 inches per year. The season starts early at this family-friendly resort offering bargain prices for big snow and an adventurous mix of easy, intermediate and expert runs as well as a full-service lodge with food, drinks, rentals and lessons. Lookout Pass also offers two terrain parks with huge banks, mounds, launches, rails and an 1,111-foot quarter pipe. Downhill Detail: 540 acres + 35 runs + 1,150 ft. vertical drop (with a planned expansion to 1,023 acres and 1,650 ft. vertical drop).

Feeling on top of the world on a bluebird day at Lost Trail Powder Mountain.

Also straddling the Montana/Idaho border on top of the Continental Divide, Lost Trail Powder Mountain is well-known for its reliable snowfall and consistently good snow conditions. From the slopes, take in breathtaking views of the Bitterroot Range of the Northern Rockies. Lost Trail is family-owned and operated and offers plenty of room for all types of skiers and boarders, whether you’re a beginner or expert. Downhill Detail: 1,800 acres + 69 runs + 1,800 ft. vertical drop.

One of Montana’s newer ski hills, Blacktail Mountain caters mostly to beginner and intermediate skiers, making it the ideal downhill destination for a memorable family ski vacation. At this unique ski area you actually start out at the top of the mountain and take the chairlift back up. The well-groomed intermediate runs here are perfect for long, carved turns with a few steep sections to mix things up. Just 17 miles from the charming town of Lakeside on Flathead Lake, take in jaw-dropping views of the lake, Glacier National Park and the Mission Mountains. Downhill Detail: 1,000 acres + 24 runs + 1,440 ft. vertical drop.

Call yourself King of the Hill on the wide-open slopes at Turner Mountain. Excellent snow conditions and beautiful scenery make for a successful day on the slopes at one of Montana’s most under-the-radar ski areas, once described as having some of the “best lift-assisted powder skiing in the U.S.” by SKI magazine. Just north of Libby, Turner boasts an impressive vertical drop—2,100 feet—and 60 percent of its terrain is rated black diamond, though there’s plenty of beginner and intermediate terrain to be explored. Fun fact: The entire ski area is available for private rental. Downhill Detail: 400 acres + 22 runs + 2,110 ft. vertical drop.

Riding high at Montana Snowbowl, only minutes from downtown Missoula. Photo: Larry Turner Photography

You’ll also find epic downhill and ski-town charm at Montana Snowbowl, 12 miles from Missoula. This extremist’s dream known for deep powder bowls and expert runs is also a local’s favorite, with plenty of terrain for beginner and intermediate skiers. The lodge’s wood-fired pizza and famous bloody marys are irresistible, too. Downhill Detail: 950 acres + 37 runs + 2,600 ft. vertical drop.

For downhill adventures at our most well-known ski area, make your way to Whitefish Mountain Resort in the quintessential winter mountain village of Whitefish.

Luxurious Girls Getaway in Glacier Country

There are few things better than taking a trip with friends and discovering the beauty of a new place together. Whether you’re looking for a relaxing spa retreat, a rustic adventure in the woods or a bluebird day on the slopes, Western Montana has something for you. Our charming small towns, luxury guest ranches and limitless adventures are ready to make your time together memorable. Come reconnect with friends in one of the most gorgeous places in the world.

We love Snow Bear’s “treehouse” chalets. Photo: Trevon Baker

EXPLORING WESTERN MONTANA’S SMALL TOWNS

Whitefish: The quintessential mountain town of Whitefish, located in Glacier National Park’s backyard, is a popular destination that’s getaway worthy any time of year. This resort town has delectable food, fine craft beer, quaint shops and funky boutiques. Find downhill skiing at nearby Whitefish Mountain Resort; during the summertime the resort offers mountain biking, zip line tours and scenic lift rides. If you are looking to hit the slopes in under a minute, stay at Snow Bear Chalets for an unforgettable trip. These luxury “treehouse” chalet rentals come with jaw-dropping views and beautiful fireplaces. Minutes from downtown, The Lodge at Whitefish Lake is Montana’s only four-diamond resort. Sit in the lakefront hot tub or pamper yourself with a relaxing facial and body scrub at the full-service day spa.

Bigfork is seriously charming. See it for yourself.

Bigfork: The storybook village of Bigfork lays on the charm. Spending a weekend here is what Hallmark movies are made of. Fill your weekend shopping at the eclectic shops and boutiques along Electric Avenue. Set aside time to enjoy live theater, fabulous food and art galleries featuring Western Montana artists. In addition to exploring all of the indoor fun, outdoor recreation abounds here during the warmer seasons. Situated on Flathead Lake, water play options are in abundance. Bridge Street Cottages offers luxurious cabins along the Swan River, or, for something more spacious, choose between a two- or three-bedroom condo at Marina Cay Resort where you can enjoy a waterfront cocktail at the Tiki bar.

Triple Creek knows fine dining, so treat yourself to a world-class dinner. Photo: Triple Creek

UNFORGETTABLE GUEST RANCH EXPERIENCES

Indulge your senses at Darby’s award-winning, adults-only retreat, Triple Creek Ranch. Immerse yourself in gourmet food and premium wines. The exquisite dining experiences will delight your palate and a seven-course Chef’s Table tasting dinner will be the highlight of your trip. Each course is presented by the chef who shares the inspiration behind the dish. Work up your appetite during the day with dog sledding in the winter or horseback rides in the warmer seasons. After dinner, soak in a private hot tub and enjoy breathtaking views of the West Fork Valley.

With thousands of acres to explore, riding on horseback is a classic way to see the countryside.

Find your inner cowgirl at The Resort at Paws Up in Greenough during their annual Cowgirl Spring Roundup April 25 – 28, 2019. Bring your friends or meet new ones—you’ll be surprised by how quickly friendships form here. The weekend will feature Cowgirl Hall of Fame honorees who will lead trail rides and cattle drives, and share their stories around roaring campfires. Cowgirls still expect the best; your days will be enhanced by luxurious accommodations and exceptional cuisine.

Reach a new level of tranquility in Western Montana. Photo: The Ranch at Rock Creek

The Ranch at Rock Creek near Philipsburg is the world’s only Forbes Travel Guide Five-Star Guest Ranch. Now through March 31, 2019, they offer an exclusive après ski and spa package—need we say more? Enjoy unlimited downhill skiing at nearby Discovery Ski Area then cap off the day with a relaxing blend of reflexology and massage. Take a recovery day and explore the historic town of Philipsburg with stops at the Philipsburg Brewing Company and The Sweet Palace candy emporium.

Golf courses here are paired with mountain views and breathtaking skies. Photo: Wilderness Club

AN ADVENTUROUS GETAWAY

If you’re planning a trip during our warmer seasons, golfing in Western Montana is a must. From championship courses to public and semi-private, there’s no better place to tee up. Our vistas are stunning, and every hole offers a scenic swing. Dynamic fairways and awe-inspiring views are found at courses throughout the region. One of our favorites—the Wilderness Club—was ranked No. 1 golf course in Montana by Golfweek. They offer exceptional resort lodging with all the comforts you’d expect.

GETTING HERE

With two major international airports—Missoula (MSO) and Glacier Park (FCA)—serviced by Allegiant Air, Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Airlines, Frontier Airlines and United Airlines, there are plenty of routes to provide smooth travel plans for visiting Western Montana.

Direct flights regularly arrive from Dallas-Fort Worth, Denver, Las Vegas, Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Phoenix-Mesa, Portland, Salt Lake City and Seattle-Tacoma. Seasonal flights arrive from Atlanta, Chicago O’Hare, Los Angeles, Oakland and San Francisco. In addition to air travel, you can get here by train on Amtrak’s Empire Builder or drive in on our very scenic highway system.

Unique and Fun Winter Activities in Western Montana

Winter in Glacier Country is for adventurous powder plungers, downhill dreamers and paradise seekers looking for a peaceful escape in an enchanting frosty forest of white. We have activities year-round here, but winter is one of our best seasons for adventure. Exploration is exponential this time of year, and it’s one of our favorite seasons to recreate in Western Montana.

Glide through miles of pristine snow. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING

Let’s face it, cross-country skiing is one of Montana’s favorite winter pastimes. Cross-country skiing makes it possible to head into backcountry quiet places that might not be otherwise accessible this time of year. You’ll find easy access to groomed trails all over Western Montana that allow you to tour the terrain in an intimate way. Trails off the beaten path are in the Bitterroot, Lolo, Kootenai and Flathead Nationals Forests. The Izaak Walton Inn in Essex offers 20 miles of sheltered trails that wind through forested terrain and offer views of Glacier National Park.

DOG SLEDDING

Travel at the speed of a dog and experience the adrenaline rush of mushing your own team of Inuit sled dogs through miles of terrain and across frozen lakes. Choose between guided half-day tours or a multinight excursion; many companies in Glacier Country offer dog sledding, but one of our favorites is Base Camp Bigfork.

Mush through a beautiful winter landscape. Photo: Base Camp Bigfork

ICE FISHING

Montana is a dream destination to drop a line in any of our four seasons—our fish bite year-round. Ice fishing in Western Montana can be a true test of skill and a whole lot of fun. So bundle up, review fishing regulations and, for phenomenal fishing, visit Flathead Lake, Whitefish Lake or any one of the lakes that dot the Seeley-Swan Valley.

SLEIGH RIDES

There isn’t a more authentic way to experience the magic of our enchanting winter wonderland than dashing through the snow in a horse-drawn sleigh. It’s also one of our coziest winter activities if you are ready to bundle up and relax. Glide across the snow with a sleigh ride from Bar W Guest Ranch in Whitefish, Double Arrow Lodge in Seeley, or Cripple Creek Horse Ranch in Trego.

Dash through the snow in Western Montana! Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

ICE SKATING

When our lakes freeze over, we don’t just admire them from afar. We lace up our skates and head out to enjoy the crisp mountain air. This peaceful winter activity is ideal for all ages, with indoor ice rinks available throughout the region as well.

FAT BIKING

Embrace all that is winter in Western Montana with this wildly fun activity that is quickly gaining in popularity. Fat biking includes riding a bike with oversized tires that make it easy to move across the snow. You can rent a fat bike and access groomed trails, snow-packed roads or the Whitefish Trail (which is ungroomed) from Whitefish Bike Retreat.

Fat biking is a fun and unique experience. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

HOT-AIR BALLOON RIDES

A hot-air balloon ride is a great way to make magical winter memories. Enjoy the crisp mountain air and breathtaking scenery while staying toasty—the hot air will ensure it. Panoramic views of never-ending bluebird skies against pure white sparkling snow are what dreams are made of. The hot-air balloon company Mountain Butterfly provides rides throughout Glacier Country with liftoffs from Glacier National Park to the Bitterroot Valley. During the summer and fall, Fantasy Flights and Phoenix Balloon Flights air up for rides around Glacier National Park.

You can’t beat the views up here. Photo: Mountain Butterfly

SNOWSHOEING

Taking a walk in the snow is high on our list of things we love. This quintessential winter pastime is one of the easiest ways to play in pristine Montana powder. Our favorite place to snowshoe in Western Montana is Glacier National Park, although there are many places throughout the region. In the park, popular places to don your snowshoes include the Going-to-the-Sun Road and trails at Marias Pass and Lake McDonald.

There is nothing quite as classic as snowshoeing with family.

Visit glaciermt.com for additional information about these activities, including safety, equipment rentals, lodging and more.

 

 

 

 

Skijoring: Winter in Glacier Country Just Got Even Cooler

Imagine you’re waterskiing, but you’re being pulled by a horse and rider through the snow. That’s how many participants describe skijoring, an outrageously entertaining winter activity that’s rapidly gaining in popularity in Western Montana’s Glacier Country.

Cheer on the racers at Skijoring at Rebecca Farm in December. Photo: Tommy Diegel Photography

The word skijoring comes from the Norwegian skijøring, which means “ski driving,” a testament to the fact that it originated in Scandinavia as a form of transportation. This once practical mode of travel has morphed into an exciting—and usually pretty rowdy—competitive sport. Here’s a quick guide to the action:

Each team consists of a horse and rider pulling a skier by a 30- to 50-foot-long rope. The skier sails over jumps, speeds through slalom gates and captures rings. Skiers may hit speeds of up to 60 mph during acceleration. Each team takes two runs through the course, which may be straight, U-, J- or L-shaped, and ranges from 600 to 1,000 feet long. The skier must cross the finish line in an upright position, on at least one ski and holding the rope. Both run times are combined to get the team’s final score, minus time penalties for missing jumps, gates and rings.

Ride ’em cowboy! A skijoring team tackles a jump at Rebecca Farm. Photo: Green Kat Photography

Races take place throughout Glacier Country from December through February, so put on your long underwear, stuff some hand warmers in your pockets and go watch—or even try your own hand at—one of winter’s wildest competitions alongside die-hard skijoring fans.

Rebecca Farm in Kalispell, best known for its annual July equestrian extravaganza of dressage, cross country and showjumping, is a natural fit to host a major skijoring event. Eighty teams and thousands of spectators made their inaugural race in 2017 a roaring success. Held the last weekend in December, skijoring at Rebecca Farm kicks off the Skijoring America racing season. It’s also a great way to spend the last weekend of the year. Downtown Kalispell is a short 5.5 miles away from the event, making lodging, dining and shopping a breeze.

Whitefish Winter Carnival’s two-day skijoring competition in late January ranks as the oldest and most storied of Montana’s skijoring competitions. In the 1960s, skijorers raced through downtown Whitefish. Legend has it that one competitor almost went through a store window, and spectators had to watch out for runaway horses. Times have definitely changed. Nowadays, the event takes place at Big Mountain Ranch, a working cattle operation with gorgeous views of Big Mountain. The J-shaped track is great for spectators, and the costume division is particularly entertaining. The ranch is just 3 miles from town, so plan to eat, shop and overnight in Whitefish. You could also tack on an extra day or two to ski fresh powder on the slopes at Whitefish Mountain Resort.

Now that’s some horsepower! Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

The Wilderness Club, a luxury ranch in Eureka, will hold its first-ever skijoring competition in early January. Close to the Canadian border and Lake Koocanusa, Eureka will be in breathtaking winter wonderland mode. After the races are over, settle in fireside at the Wilderness Club Lodge, or warm up in the hot tub.

Mid-February will bring Skijor Columbia Falls’ inaugural “Soldiers, Saddles and Skis: The Race for Valor,” a fundraiser for Valor Equine Therapy. Combine your support for the skijorers and their noble cause with a trip to nearby Glacier National Park for an even more unforgettable weekend of alpine adventures.

Find out what it’s like to “waterski on snow.” Photo: Stuart Thurlkill, The Resort at Paws Up

Not content to sit on the sidelines? Book a stay at The Wilderness Club in Eureka, The Resort at Paws Up in Greenough or Triple Creek Ranch in Darby. Along with top-notch accommodations, they all include skijoring on their lists of guest activities. If you’ve already got other lodging planned, both The Wilderness Club and The Resort at Paws Up offer skijoring activities to the public.

Come See St. Regis: A Small-Town Gem in Western Montana

The charming crossroads community of St. Regis is a road-trip must-stop. Travelers on the Interstate Highway 90 corridor between Missoula, Montana and Coeur d’Alene, Idaho never miss the chance to pull over and stretch their legs in this treasured town nestled at the confluence of the Bitterroot, Coeur d’Alene and Cabinet Mountain ranges.

St. Regis is a convenient stop on I-90. Pull in for a small-town Montana experience! Photo: St. Regis Travel Center

The family-owned St. Regis Travel Center is known far and wide as a place to stop and stay a little while. It’s more than just a convenient spot to fill your gas tank. Fuel up on great food and famous huckleberry milkshakes at Huck’s Grill, plus Dolly V’s ice cream, fudge and espresso. There’s a live trout aquarium, too and Montana’s largest gift shop, where you’ll find souvenirs in abundance and free popcorn to boot.

Enjoy a sweet treat at Dolly V’s Ice Cream + Espresso inside St. Regis Travel Center. Photo: St. Regis Travel Center

Head off the interstate and onto the St. Regis-Paradise Scenic Byway—state Route 135—winding 22 miles through gorgeous national forest land including rolling flats and steep canyon walls. This route is part of the Clark Fork Scenic Drive through the Coeur d’Alene Mountains, beginning in Alberton and hooking up with Montana’s Tour 200 scenic route. Stop along the way for fishing, hiking, camping and wildlife viewing, or a soak in the healing mineral waters of Quinn’s Hot Springs Resort.

The views from St. Regis reveal Western Montana at its finest. Photo: Trail Rail Run

Recreation abounds in the St. Regis area. In addition to St. Regis Community Park’s half-mile interpretive nature trail, playground and pond—perfect for a pit stop picnic—authentic outdoor adventure is all around. Fly-fish the Clark Fork River, ski Lookout Pass (about 30 minutes west of St. Regis) and discover plenty of places to hike and bike in Lolo National Forest.

Don’t look down! Bicyclists cross one of seven repurposed railroad trestles on the Route of the Hiawatha

The Route of the Hiawatha provides pedaling fun the whole family will enjoy. This 15-mile Rails-to-Trails adventure, not far from St. Regis, traverses 10 tunnels and seven high trestles along breathtaking stretches of scenic Montana landscapes, and a shuttle is offered for those who prefer to skip the up-hill trek. Mountain bikers can find 18 miles of epic single-track on one of the best trails in all of Glacier Country—the Clark Fork River Trail (also a great hiking spot—try the Cascade Falls spur trail). This smooth ride follows the river through pristine, lush forestland, and the trailhead is not far from Quinn’s.

Head for the hills and a little history on the Crystal Lake Trail. This 3.8-mile uphill hike can be moderate to difficult at times, but worth experiencing the sparkling Crystal Lake 1.5 miles from the trailhead. Stop along the way for berry picking, fishing and viewing the remnants of a historic abandoned mining town and Deer Creek Mining Company, including the ruins of several cabins and a sunken mine shaft.

Swing your golf clubs against the backdrop of the Bitterroot Range at the beautiful, family-friendly Trestle Creek Golf Course. Tee times are usually available on short notice and golf clubs can be rented on-site—perfect when you feel like a spontaneous stop for some time on the green.

The St. Regis River flows east to meet the Clark Fork in the city of St. Regis. Photo: Trail Rail Run

St. Regis hosts the largest flea market in Montana every Memorial Day weekend at Community Park. For three days from dawn to dusk, vendors peddle their wares. Find a true Montana treasure to take home with you, plus breakfast, lunch and snacks.

This tightly knit community charms with events like an annual Easter egg hunt, scarecrow contest, Christmas lighting, Trail Rail Run, Fourth of July parade and fireworks. Come on over and see St. Regis for yourself.

Lovely Lakeside: Exploring Small-Town Charm on Flathead Lake

The shores of Flathead Lake—the largest freshwater lake in the West—boast some pretty spectacular communities, and the lovely little town of Lakeside is no exception. Hugging the western shore of the lake’s northern tip, ease of access to the water is a highlight, but this popular summertime destination happens to be a Glacier Country getaway worth getting away to any time of year.

Fall is the perfect time to plan for next summer’s visit to Lakeside.

With a name like Lakeside, expectations are high and this little town lives up to them. Lake life, winter recreation and small-town charm an hour from Glacier National Park? We’re always up for that.

There are endless ways to explore Flathead Lake, but a Far West Boat Tour is a must. Board this historic Montana cruise ship for a fun, educational and awe-inspiring cruise or private charter seasonally from Lakeside.

Enjoy the water and the serene lakeside landscape at West Shore / Flathead Lake State Park. Sheltered by lush forestland, West Shore offers glacially-carved rock outcroppings and spectacular lake views of the Mission and Swan Mountain ranges. Fishing—especially along the rocky shoreline—and boating are popular here, and there’s a 31-site RV-accessible campground in the park.

West Shore State Park in Lakeside offers recreational opportunities galore on Flathead Lake.

Lakeside’s Volunteer Park offers a beach hangout and pier access, swim docks, a boat dock, canoe and bicycle racks and pavilions available for rent.

The town of Lakeside itself is quaint and picturesque. Stroll through locally owned shops and eateries while taking in views of the Swan Mountains. Serving up one of the best breakfasts in Lakeside, head to The Homestead Café for huckleberry pancakes.

An antique store filled with western collectibles adds to Lakeside’s small-town charm.

Montana ranks #4 in the nation for craft breweries per capita, and Lakeside is proud to be the home of Tamarack Brewing Company. A post-adventure, artisan beer is a Montana must, and their chicken wings are famous.

Savor the flavor of Montana at Beargrass Bistro, offering easygoing upscale dining—including a kids’ menu—as well as wine, beer and cocktails. This Lakeside gem prepares seasonally inspired dishes using locally and regionally sourced ingredients.

Toast to Lakeside at the Beargrass Bistro.

Western Montana is known for world-class winter recreation and Lakeside is a pretty exceptional ski destination for snow enthusiasts. Boasting panoramic views of Flathead Lake, the Mission Mountains and Glacier National Park, Blacktail Mountain Ski Area is just 30 minutes from town and the surrounding Blacktail Mountain Nordic Trails are perfect for scenic hiking and cross-country skiing.

Gorgeous fall colors will give way to wintry white on the road to Blacktail Mountain Ski Resort. Hello, ski season!

Lodging in Lakeside is always warm and friendly, representing that western hospitality we’re known for here in Glacier Country. Stay at one of the condos or cabins at Edgewater RV Resort & Motel, or choose from a number of cozy spots from which you can explore Lakeside, Montana.

A dusting of snow in early fall reveals spectacular views of Flathead Lake and the Mission and Swan mountains.

 

 

 

 

 

Reel Talk: Fall Fishing in Montana is Phenomenal

Autumn anglers, this one’s for you. Fall fishing is upon us in Western Montana’s Glacier Country, and we’re chomping at the bit. While fishing the pristine waters of Montana’s rivers, lakes and streams is phenomenal year-round, autumn offers an incredibly authentic angling experience: fewer folks on the water, quieter rivers, and—spoiler alert—October and November offer some of the year’s best trout fishing, and hardcore anglers know it. We may as well call it “trophy trout season.”

Casting for cutthroat trout on the Middle Fork of the Flathead River. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

RIVERS + FISHING ACCESS SITES

If casting a line in a river or stream meandering peacefully through fall’s golden landscape, breathing in the cool mountain air, and hearing the bugle of a bull elk sounds like paradise to you, then grab your waders and come on over to experience the solitude of the season. Good hatches are on tap and monster brown trout are spawning—we wait all year for fall lake runs.

Fish the magical blue-ribbon trout waters of the Blackfoot River, made famous by Norman Maclean’s “A River Runs Through It” and offering some of Montana’s best fishing. Get out your mahoganies, midges and blue-winged olives for fall fly-fishing here, as well as on the Clark Fork River where rainbows are on the rise and fall colors are in full effect. Or, find multiple fishing access site along the winding and scenic Bitterroot River, flowing through the beautiful Bitterroot Valley and ready for your mayflies, hoppers and worms.

For experienced anglers who know how to navigate big rivers and plan to fish with streamers up to five inches long, the Kootenai River below Libby Dam offers huge rainbow trout, a boat ramp and easily accessible shorelines.

Up north near Glacier National Park, the Middle Fork of the Flathead River provides a scenic 9-mile fall float from Moccasin Creek to West Glacier—which takes about four hours this time of year—in stunning emerald-colored waters full of cutthroat trout.

Multiple fishing access sites are available throughout the the state. Consult Montana’s Fishing Access Sites Field Guide for maps, species and land information.

Keeping it reel on the Bitterroot River. Photo: Shea Shaughnessy

LAKE FISHING IN MONTANA

Fishing in Montana usually conjures up images of casting a fly rod in an idyllic river setting, but Western Montana boasts some pretty phenomenal lake fishing. The deep, cold waters of Flathead Lake—the largest freshwater lake west of the Mississippi—offers cutthroat and lake trout as well as whitefish and yellow pike. The Mission Mountain scenery is incredible and western hospitality abounds in the surrounding communities. Seeley Lake is a year-round recreation destination, offering stunning views of the Swan and Mission ranges and excellent bass fishing.

Straddling the U.S.-Canada border in the northwest corner of the state, the 90-mile-long Lake Koocanusa reservoir has been known to produce 10-pound rainbow trout in the fall—one of our best-kept secrets. Lake Como, a few miles north of the quintessential Old West town of Darby, is quite a popular fishing spot in the warmer season. Fall provides an opportunity to fish this local’s favorite with a little more solitude—and bask in the beauty of autumn in the Bitterroot Valley while you’re at it.

Jigging is our preferred method for deep lake fishing, and heavily-weighted jigging spoons your best bet. If you’re stillwater savvy, you might consider lake fly-fishing. Some of the largest fish you’ll find by fly may actually come out of a lake. Make sure to use a special stillwater indicator.

Going on a fishing trip with a knowledgeable outfitter like Glacier Raft Co. can help ensure a great catch. Photo: Glacier Raft Co.

GLACIER COUNTRY FISHING GUIDES

World-class fly-fishing tends to attract world-class fishing guides, and Glacier Country is chock-full of experienced and friendly outfitters and guides with the local knowledge and inside scoop on fishing in Western Montana. They’re always ready and eager to take you out to their favorite fishing spot and help you land the big one. From finding the right fall fly, to steering you toward the best stream, to guiding you down the river on a daylong or overnight float trip, this is their life’s work, and they love every second of it—you will, too.

While wade-fishing is the most common way to fish Western Montana’s rivers and streams, float fishing is becoming increasingly popular, especially on larger rivers, and hiring a guide is your best bet for a successful float-fishing adventure.

Another reason to go with a guide? Western Montana boasts endless off-the-beaten path “secret spot” streams, trickling mountain creeks and hidden alpine lakes. The best way to find these local treasures is to go with a guide who’ll happily share their spot.

For more information on outfitters and guides, visit the Montana Outfitters and Guides Association at montanaoutfitters.org.

Western Montana is a fly-fishing mecca.

FALL FISHING TIPS + TRICKS IN WESTERN MONTANA

Fish the fall run. Stripping big streamers will bring in the biggest brown trout during their fall run mid-October through November or early December. Find a stretch of river downstream of the spawning run of a lake or larger river.

Head for the hatch. November’s baetis (blue-winged olive) hatch offers excellent fall dry-fly-fishing at a time when most of our rivers are experiencing low to no fishing pressure.

Be prepared for any kind of weather and dress accordingly. We can’t say it enough: Montana’s fall weather can have a flair for the dramatic. You could wake up to fresh snow and be fishing in a T-shirt by noon. Or vice versa. Check weather reports before you head out, and always be prepared. Base layers are essential this time of year, especially when wade fishing in a cold stream.

Permits, rules and regulations. A valid fishing license is required for all types of fishing on state waters. To fish in Montana, most anglers need two licenses: a conservation license and a fishing license. Visit Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks for state fishing regulations—including catch and release guidelines and daily possession limits.

Fishing on tribal lands. Western Montana is home to two Indian reservations—the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation and the Blackfeet Tribe of the Blackfeet Reservation. Special rules and regulations apply when recreating on tribal lands. If you’re planning to fish Blackfeet Nation Indian Reservation land, visit Blackfeet Fish and Wildlife Department. For Flathead Reservation fishing regulations, visit the Natural Resources Department of the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes.

For more information on autumn angling adventures in Western Montana, click here or contact Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks.

7 Reasons to Turn a Griz Game Into a Weekend Getaway in Missoula

It’s no secret that we’re serious Griz fans here in Western Montana. The college-football community of Missoula boasts mountains of pride for the Division 1 Montana Grizzlies. Every football season Griz fans flock to the University of Montana’s Washington-Grizzly Stadium to cheer on our beloved team.

Missoula’s population jumps by more than 30 percent on these days! It’s not just the game we love, but the energy and excitement of 24,000 feet stomping to “We Will Rock You” by Queen, the boom of a cannon fired at every touchdown, and the halftime shows by the Grizzly Marching Band, featuring songs from artists like The Beatles and Pentatonix.

A Griz-eye view of Washington-Grizzly Stadium. Photo: Destination Missoula

The game-time spirit is palpable and unwavering. Eager tailgaters set up as soon as possible and the grounds around the stadium are transformed into a celebration of food trucks, vendors and die-hard fans.

With three home games left this season, come immerse yourself in one of Western Montana’s most prized events and explore the idyllic mountain town of Missoula—a Glacier Country arts, culture and recreation hot spot full of charm.

1. AUTHENTIC MONTANA LODGING + HOSPITALITY

Missoula boasts almost 70 hotels, motels and inns, from national chains to locally-owned establishments, and the warmest western hospitality around. Take note and plan ahead: Missoula hotels fill up fast for home games. If you don’t score one in time don’t fret—Missoula has plenty of VRBO and Airbnb rentals.

2. FOOD + DRINK FUN

We love to eat and drink, and we always want the best of both. From fine dining to cafés, and everything in between—including epic tailgate fare—there’s literally something for everyone in this community of creative, sustainable and delicious local cuisine. With 10 breweries, three distilleries, two wineries and a new cidery in a town of 75,000 people, it’s pretty obvious we’re serious about crafting beverages. We’re not lacking for good coffee shops here, either. Seasonal flavors abound this time of year, so it’s an excellent opportunity to savor a taste of Montana.

Enjoy a pumpkin beer or other seasonal brew at one of Missoula’s craft breweries.

3. ENDLESS THINGS TO DO IN MISSOULA

This is one Montana town that bustles year-round. Pack adventure onto either side of the Griz Game festivities. Missoula has a fast-growing renowned live music scene, museums, art galleries and unique shopping options, plus three rivers and an endless system of wilderness trails, so there’s plenty of outdoor recreation to be found here as well.

Hike the “M” for a gorgeous view of Missoula’s fall colors.

4. LOCAL EVENTS LIVEN UP TOWN YEAR-ROUND

Here’s what Missoula’s got on tap during the next three Grizzly home games.

OCTOBER 6 – GRIZ vs. PORTLAND STATE VIKINGS
It’s Grizzly Homecoming Weekend!

Land on Friday and catch a Montana Film Festival show at the Roxy, then stop by Montgomery Distilling for a tour and tasting before taking part in First Friday Gallery Night (don’t miss the Radius Gallery). While downtown, grab dinner at any one of downtown Missoula’s eateries—you can’t go wrong.

Saturday, wake up and head downtown for the Homecoming Parade, featuring music performances, dancers, the Shriners, and more. Then it’s game time. After the game, follow the crowd to a local pub for post-game festivities.

Sunday, grab brunch at Draught Works Brewery and then head to Turner Farms Annual Pumpkin Fest for harvest fun. End the weekend at The Top Hat for a unique five-course Cider Dinner in partnership with Western Cider.

OCTOBER 27 – GRIZ vs. UC DAVIS AGGIES
Join in on the pre-Halloween fun that’s sure to take over Missoula this weekend.

Friday night enjoy the casual atmosphere and contemporary Asian cuisine at the Mustard Seed Asian Café or try Missoula’s new dine-in movie theater.

Saturday morning grab coffee and freshly-baked pastries at the Missoula Farmers Market (voted best of the West),  and the Clark Fork Market. Hike to the M and then head to the game early for some tailgating—hit the GAS Tailgate Party to purchase food and drinks, watch the pregame show, and listen to live music (or a DJ). After the game, make your way to the county fairgrounds for Missoula’s Haunted House.

On Sunday, grab Biers + Brunch at Bayern Brewing and then head to the University of Montana for costumed revelry at the Skeleton Skedaddle 5k & 1k races.

The energy in the stands is electric, particularly on a beautiful fall day. Photo: Destination Missoula 

NOVEMBER 17 – GRIZ vs. MONTANA STATE BOBCATS  

You’ve got two concert options for Friday night in Missoula: The Devil Makes Three takes the stage at 8 p.m. at the historic Wilma theater, and Jeffrey Foucault plays the Top Hat at 9 p.m.

See a show AND the game. The Top Hat and the Wilma are two of the hottest venues in the Northwest. Photo: Neaubauer Media/Logjam Presents

Saturday before the game, stroll the Missoula Valley Winter Market—a local farmers market—for coffee, fresh baked goods, home-grown produce, and local arts and crafts (perfect for Montana souvenirs). Then, walk along the river trail to the game.

Sunday, grab breakfast at The Catalyst Café & Espresso Bar and then hit the streets for some early holiday shopping in Missoula’s downtown galleries and shops. Start at the north end of Higgins Avenue and make your way across the bridge (over Caras Park and the scenic Clark Fork River) to Missoula’s Hip Strip. Grab a sweet treat from Bernice’s Bakery or Le Petit Outre.

5. MISSOULA IS SURROUNDED BY DAY-TRIP-WORTHY ATTRACTIONS

From Missoula you could venture out in any direction and find an authentic Montana adventure. Epic day trips are a dime a dozen here.

Take a scenic drive down the Bitterroot Valley exploring several charming towns along the way. A short way from Stevensville is the Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, home to various types of wildlife. If you visit in October, you are likely to see large flocks of Canadian Geese resting from migration on the ponds.

Root for maroon and silver but also check out our yellows and oranges. Photo: Donnie Sexton

Or, start early and drive north through the stunning Mission Valley and stop near Moiese at the National Bison Range where you can witness 350 – 500 head of bison; if you’re visiting during the fall rut you may even hear the bugle of a bull elk.

6. INSIDER TIPS + TRICKS TO MAKE THE ADVENTURE EVEN BETTER

Pre-Game Like a Griz Fan: When it comes to tailgating, a Griz fan’s game is strong. Get in on the action and mingle with the locals before the game.

Ask a Local: We’re known for being some of the friendliest folks around, so if you’re looking for the inside scoop on where to eat, drink, or play, just ask us.

7. GETTING TO AND AROUND MISSOULA IS EASY

Flying into the Missoula International Airport (MSO) is pretty convenient, serviced by multiple major airlines with direct flights regularly arriving from 11 cities across the U.S. Once you land, car rentals are easy. Or, leave the driving to someone else and call Uber or Lyft, both of which are available in Missoula.

Pro-Tip: Park your car downtown and walk the Kim Williams Trail along the Clark Fork River directly to the University of Montana.