Category Archives: Native American Culture

Exploring the Blackfeet Nation

Last week, I headed over to the east side of the Continental Divide to spend a bit of time on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. Bordering the east side of Glacier National Park, the Blackfeet Nation is a beautiful place where the wind-swept plains meet the rolling foothills before being engulfed by the impressive rise of the peaks of the Rocky Mountains.

Looking down into Glacier National Park's Two Medicine Valley.

There’s something about the Blackfeet Nation that feels almost magical to me. Perhaps it’s the hours my family spent here when I was just a little blond-haired missy. Or maybe it’s the wild beauty of it that nearly takes my breath away. Perhaps it’s the rich history, culture, heritage and strength of the Blackfeet people. But to pick just one thing that makes this land so special is nearly impossible. So I won’t. And I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Blackfeet warrior sculptures greet visitors at the Blackfeet Nation's four entrances.

The tribe's bison herd relaxes in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains.

Happy trails,
TT

PS: To learn more about the Blackfeet Nation, visit glaciermt.com.

Montana Summer: A Photo Recap

I’m not sure how many of you feel this way, but this girl is having a hard time saying goodbye to summer. It’s like I blinked and all of the sudden it’s gone.

This summer was definitely one for the books, with thousands of miles logged, countless scoops of ice cream consumed and beautiful snapshots of images that will be carried with me always. And while I’m looking forward to autumn, colorful fall foliage, beautiful drives and spiced cider, my heart is still mourning the loss of summer.

But instead of saying goodbye, I’m going to bid summer a hearty farewell, so long and a hope to see you soon. And summer, until we meet again, I’m going to remember the good times and adventures we shared under Montana’s big blue sky.

Lake McDonald from Apgar, Glacier National Park

A quiet creek near Stevensville, Bitterroot Valley

Outdoor summer concert - Missoula

Kerr Dam - Flathead Valley

Late summer afternoon - Tobacco Valley

Early morning sunrise - St. Ignatius

A summer tradition - Serrano's in East Glacier

Fly-fishing with friends in the rain - Glacier National Park

Hello beautiful - Glacier National Park

Hiking with baby brother - Holland Falls

Blackfeet Nation

Missoula from Mt. Sentinel

Summer = Strawberry Lemonade

Seeley-Swan Valley

Montana hugs and kisses,
TT

Five Days in Glacier Country, Montana

Happy first day of autumn! I hope this finds you each well, relishing the past months of summer and looking forward to a beautiful fall.

Last week, I headed off for a few days with two of my favorite Montana ladies and some friends from Europe. We were together a total of five days (give or take a few hours) and definitely made the most of our time by exploring Western Montana’s Glacier Country and cramming in as much fun as we possibly could.

Our trip included exploring Whitefish, Missoula and Kalispell, sampling beer from Great Northern Brewery, zip lining/Walk in the Treetops at Whitefish Mountain Resort, a trail ride at Bar W Guest Ranch, lake cruises on Whitefish Lake and Flathead Lake, a red bus tour in Glacier National Park, checking out museums, rafting, hiking and eating delicious food from Whitefish to Somers and Missoula to Charlo. But instead of just telling you about it, I’m going to show you.

A boat ride aboard 'Lady of the Lake' on Whitefish Lake.

Traveling the Going-to-the-Sun Road in our red bus.

Beautiful McDonald Creek in Glacier National Park.

Lake McDonald Lodge, Glacier National Park

The Far West docking in Lakeside, Montana.

Ninepipes Museum in Charlo, Montana

A Kootenai Indian Dress on display at Ninepipes Museum.

A kayaker enjoying a late summer paddle on Brennan's Wave in Missoula, Montana.

We rode the Carousel!

Checking out a plane used by smokejumpers at the Smokejumper Visitor Center in Missoula, Montana.

Until next week,
TT

Montana Summer: Let’s Plan For Fun

Happy June!

Can you believe I just wrote that? Maybe it’s just me, but it seems like the last few months have absolutely flown by…but I’m not even mad about it. Because that means summer is HERE! Well, almost. (It’s coming, I promise.)

For many of you, you may be planning your vacation to Montana this year, still deciding where you’re heading or heck, maybe you’re on your way to us now. To help you in your decision, we’ve pulled together some events and happenings that are sure to make your vacation a little bit sweeter.

JUNE
Western Heritage Days
The quaint community of Stevensville hosts Western Heritage Days, June 17 – 18. The celebration marks 170 years of Stevensville as a community and includes a parade, St. Mary’s Mission tours, dancing and a chuckwagon cook-off.

St. Mary's Mission, Stevensville

Libby Logger Days
Held June 23 – 26 in the northwest corner of Montana, Libby Logger Days is an educational event that shares the forestry culture with attendees. The festivities include a carnival, boxing smoker, kids logging competition, parade, live music, lawn mower races and an adult logging competition.

JULY
David Thompson Days
For folks looking to stroll 200 years back in time, head to Thompson Falls to participate in David Thompson Days, held July 2, where re-enactors replicate the lifestyle of early North American exploration, survival and trade. As part of the festivities, you’ll see historic displays and demonstrations, primitive arts and crafts, live music and games. David Thompson Days take a special look at explorer David Thompson (1770 – 1857), who traveled more than 50,000 miles by foot, horse and canoe as he mapped many of the uncharted territories in upper North America.

North American Indian Days
This year, North American Indian Days marks its 60th annual celebration July 7 – 10 on the Blackfeet Nation in Browning. One of the largest gatherings of North American tribes, the event provides insight into Blackfeet traditions, with dancing, traditional games and a rodeo.

North American Indian Days, Browning.

Flathead Cherry Festival
Held July 16 – 17 in Polson, the Flathead Cherry Festival celebrates the sweet, dark cherry that grows in orchards along the shores of Flathead Lake. The festival includes a cherry pie eating contest, quilting contest and is a great family event. Plus, a stellar crop is expected for this year’s harvest.

AUGUST
Huckleberry Festival
Located in Trout Creek, this festival celebrates the beloved purple berry and is held August 12 – 14. The festival includes a parade, street dance, auction, children’s activities and numerous craft and food vendors. Small town fun at its best!

Mmm, huckleberries. Photo courtesy Donnie Sexton/Montana Office of Tourism

River City Roots Festival
Held August 27 – 28, the River City Roots Fest is Missoula at its finest. The festival includes all-day music stages, a juried art show, family activities and a 4K walk/run.

For more events happening throughout the summer, visit glaciermt.com.

TT

The Rope

It’s summer in Montana and that means it’s time to hit the open road and play, play, play. My last adventure had me visiting the Blackfeet Nation for North American Indian Days.

This year, NAID attracted more than 500 dancers and had members from 50 different tribes throughout the United States and Canada in attendance. During the festivities, we attended the dancing, stick games and rodeo. (And trust me, this Montana girl loves a good rodeo).

The parade at North American Indian Days in Browning

The parade at North American Indian Days in Browning


North American Indian Days in Browning

North American Indian Days in Browning

We also spent time in East Glacier and were able to head out and “help” (ok, we watched) the cowboys round up bucking horses for Sunday’s main rodeo event in Browning. And boy did we enjoy watching the roundup!

The part that sticks out is my mind the most is the sound of the herd–we could hear them before we could see them–as they stampeded toward us with five cowboys on horseback wooping and hollering bringing them in.
wild horses

mom and colt

"Mouse" Hall, a true Montana cowboy.

And the icing on the cake?
TJ

This cowboy gave me his rope. We may be in love.

TT

Glacier Centennial: First Peoples, Two Countries, Three Voices

September 16, 2009
First Peoples, Two Countries, Three Voices
Flathead Valley Community College in partnership with the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) kicked off their Crown of the Continent Centennial Lecture Series last night.

The evening consisted of a conversation with leaders of the Blackfoot Confederacy, Salish-Pend Oreille, and the Kootenai/Ktnuxa nations. Speakers included Herman Many Guns from the Piikani Blackfoot Tribes, Tony Incashola from the Salish Tribes, and Vernon Finley from the Kootenai Tribes. 
 

Herman Many Guns commenced the conversation with a traditional prayer, a perfect opening to what followed. The dialogue spanned a great deal of wisdom and story telling. Values of each culture were shared- such as that of Vernan Finely’s grandmother’s teaching of the importance of using our five senses to Tony Incashola’s comments on remembering where we all come from.

It was acknowledged by each of the tribes that this was an ideal space for such a series– the location is known as the Village Center to the Kootenai peoples. It happens to be the center of the Crown of the Continent National Geographic Geotourism Map, as well.

The lecture ended with wise words encouraging all people to work together to protect these resources and the special culture that exists here in the Crown of the Continent. Each tribal member expressed their gratitude for their invitation to the table. Vernon regarded that it is not of their interest that such an event exists– instead it is the interest of each of the audience members that the conversation has taken place, suggesting that it is up to us to continue the discussion.

 

 
Join us on Monday for the second lecture:
Sep 21, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Setting the Stage- Describing the Crown Region
Speaker: Dr. Jim Byrne
Flathead Valley Community College Continuing Education Center
For more information on Glacier’s Centennial, please visit www.glaciercentennial.org