Category Archives: Fall

8 Things Not to be Missed This Fall in Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park is open year-round and every season in the park is stunning. Fall, however, is uniquely magical. The Crown of the Continent’s glacier-carved valleys and mountainsides are painted with the golden hues of autumn, amplifying the already jaw-dropping views. Fewer visitors, abundant birding and wildlife watching, and exclusive biking access on the Going-to-the-Sun Road make it one of the best times to enjoy the park. Here are our top eight reasons why you should visit Glacier in its golden season.

The Crown of the Continent beckons leaf peepers.

BIRD WATCHING

Glacier National Park’s preserved and pristine landscape makes for prime bird habitat. Its skies are graced with soaring raptors, the lakes and rivers flush with waterfowl and shorebirds, and sweeping meadows and woodlands visited by beautiful songbirds. One bird you can expect to see in fall is the golden eagle—one of North America’s largest and fastest birds of prey—as every fall thousands of them migrate through Glacier.

The golden eagle is one of North America’s largest birds of prey.

SCENIC DRIVES

Chase fall colors and enjoy the sheer beauty of golden alpine forests. With a landscape that varies from jagged mountain peaks to sweeping meadows, Glacier has world-class, scenic drives. A favorite route of ours is Looking Glass Road. This curvy route is located on the Blackfeet Reservation on the east side of the park. Along with picturesque views looking into Two Medicine, you’ll also have a good chance of seeing wildlife in valleys along the highway, including bears, moose and wolves. Being amazed by Glacier can be as simple as driving around.

You don’t even need to see what’s around the next bend to be stopped in your tracks at Glacier National Park.

WILDLIFE WATCHING

One thing that makes Glacier so special is that we share the land with an abundance of beautiful, wild creatures; it’s home to 19 large mammals, including bear, moose and bighorn sheep. As one of the most intact ecosystems in the lower 48 states, there are plenty of opportunities to view wildlife. During the fall, deer, elk and moose are in rut and bears enter hyperphagia (a stage where they eat and drink nonstop to gain weight in preparation for hibernation), making it the most active season to spot wildlife. As always, remember that the wildlife is just that–wild. Stay safe by respecting their space. 

Seeing a moose in the wild is an unforgettable experience. Photo: Bynum

BIKE THE GOING-TO-THE-SUN ROAD

For many, the highlight of their trip to Glacier National Park is the Going-to-the-Sun Road—an engineering marvel and National Historic Landmark. Fall offers the unique opportunity to bike the Going-to-the-Sun Road, after the road has been closed to cars (Oct. 15, weather dependent). The cool temperature and awe-inspiring landscape make it a pretty epic way to spend a day in Glacier. Beginning in spring 2020, e-bikes will be allowed everywhere bikes are in national parks.

Elevate your cycling adventure in Glacier Country.

FISHING

Glacier National Park has some of the most pristine, undisturbed waters nature has to offer. Autumn specifically is an incredible time to fish Glacier—fewer folks on the water, quieter rivers and some of the year’s best trout fishing. The Middle Fork of the Flathead River is chock-full of cutthroat and rainbow trout, prime for fly-fishing. Or reel in lake trout on Lake McDonald or one of the park’s many glacial lakes. A valid fishing license is required for all types of fishing, and when fishing on tribal lands an additional license is required. Plan your visit and read the regulations before you go.

Cast for cutthroat trout on the Middle Fork of the Flathead River. Photo: Thompson Westslope

HIKING

Hiking is one of the most intimate ways to explore Glacier National Park, touring the terrain by foot allows you to get up close and personal with nature. Immerse yourself in the grandeur of fall while hiking one of the park’s 734 miles of trails. Enjoy the uncrowded boardwalk on the Trail of the Cedars, or the stillness of a hike through an alpine forest to a glacial lake or cascading waterfall. 

Fall is the perfect time to set off on an adventure. Photo: Couser

GLACIER BY TRAIN

Exploring Glacier National Park on Amtrak’s Empire Builder is a fun and memorable experience. A round-trip journey from Whitefish to Cut Bank or a ride in from Seattle in the fall offer the opportunity to see Glacier draped in golden hues. There are several observation decks between the coach cars, and they provide incredible views. Cozy up—this very scenic and relaxing ride makes for a magical experience. You’ll finally understand why your grandpa loves trains so much. 

Fall for miles and miles of autumn on an Amtrak adventure. Photo: Alex Hanich

SHOULDER SEASON PRICING

Take advantage of shoulder season prices and uncrowded destinations. Grab a drink at Glacier Distilling Company in Coram. Open year-round, the historic Izaak Walton Inn in Essex sits track-side and combines railroad history with outdoor recreation, or opt to stay in the Historic Tamarack Lodge and Cabins complete with an on-site restaurant and espresso bar. All of your fishing, boating, hiking and camping rental needs can be found at Glacier Outdoor Center, or, if you’re looking for a guided hike, rock climbing or winter sports excursion, Glacier Adventure Guides operates year-round in and around Glacier National Park. 

Get cozy fireside at the Izaak Walton Inn. Photo: Donnie Sexton

Traveling to Glacier National Park in fall is an unforgettable experience, best fitted with the flexible type of person who enjoys self-guided tours and seeing more animals than humans. Most of the lodging, restaurants and concessionaire services close mid-October. For the right person, going to Glacier National Park in the fall is an authentic, off-the-beaten-path opportunity to see the Crown of the Continent at its finest.

Western Montana Wild West Adventures Part 2

Glacier Country has a number of ranches—both rustic and luxury—offering warm western hospitality, relaxation and recreation opportunities like fly-fishing, hiking, snowshoeing, and, of course, horseback riding under big blue skies. Experience the beauty of Western Montana’s breathtaking landscapes, bask in infinite adventures and get to know our friendly, saddle-savvy locals from a traditionally western vantage point.

There’s something magical about riding horseback on a brisk autumn morning. Photo: The Resort at Paws Up/ Stuart Thurikill

COWGIRL SPRING ROUNDUP + CATTLE DRIVES AT THE RESORT AT PAWS UP

Cowgirl Spring Roundup at The Resort at Paws Up lets you release your inner cowgirl. Make new friends or travel with your gal pals to Greenough—you won’t want to miss the chance to brush up on your horsemanship skills, relax during scenic trail rides and learn traditional ranch skills. Cowgirl Hall of Famers join the group around a roaring campfire, sharing stories to inspire and empower. Cap off the day with exceptional cuisine and drinks. If you can’t make it for the Cowgirl Spring Roundup your yen for western adventure doesn’t have to dissipate. Cowboy activities include a Cattle Drive, available for all guests and skill levels, and a tour of Garnet Ghost Town, or, during the Mustang Mindfulness Demo, learn about one of the five wild mustangs rescued by Paws Up.

Let your mind wander during a carriage ride at The Resort at Paws Up. Photo: The Resort at Paws Up/Stuart Thurilkill

RICH RANCH

Experience the true essence of cowboy life in the Old West during a traditional dude ranch vacation at Rich Ranch near Seeley Lake. Each season brings new activities to the ranch. Spring is filled with wildlife watching as elk, moose and mountain goats come down from the mountains. Summer offers the quintessential ranch experience with daily horseback rides, lake swimming, pond fishing for children, fly-fishing trips, family-style meals and nightly campfires. In the fall, guided fishing and hunting trips prevail with the opportunity to stay in a wall tent or hunting cabin, and winter brings a powder paradise perfect for snowmobiling adventures.

Saddle up and embark on your next adventure with Rich Ranch. Photo: Rich Ranch

THE RANCH AT ROCK CREEK

The Ranch at Rock Creek, near Philipsburg, is the world’s first Forbes Travel Guide Five-Star Guest Ranch and is your destination for a luxurious western getaway. Their all-inclusive ranch experience comes with luxury accommodations and gourmet dining—nobody said your Wild West adventure couldn’t be sophisticated. Choose two activities a day during your stay—horseback riding, archery, skeet shooting, naturalist classes and wildlife watching are just a few of the options.

Take a step back in time at The Ranch at Rock Creek. Photo: The Ranch at Rock Creek

CHEFF RANCH & LEGACY OUTFITTERS

Take in the breathtaking scenery of the Mission Mountains from Charlo while riding horseback at Cheff Ranch & Legacy Outfitters. The ranch sits on hundreds of acres, perfect for trail rides, hiking and biking. The main ranch is open May – September, or, for a fall adventure, get off the beaten path by exploring the Bob Marshall Wilderness during a hunting or fishing excursion. Ride 28 miles into base camp and fly-fish the South Fork of the Flathead River—you can even learn to fly-fish horseback! The wall tent at base camp will keep you warm, and cots, showers and basic amenities will make sure your stay’s not too rustic. The Cheff family has more than 85 years of guiding experience, and their vast knowledge of the area will get you into some of the best fishing spots in Glacier Country.

Around every bend is a new awe-inspiring vista. Photo: Cheff Ranch & Legacy Outfitters

TRIPLE CREEK RANCH

Restore and renew in the cowboy culture, beautiful scenery and luxury accommodations at Darby’s award-winning, adults-only retreat, Triple Creek Ranch. This Montana hideaway is nestled in the lush forest of the Bitterroot Valley, one of the most picturesque parts of our region. Pan for sapphires, cast a line into a blue-ribbon trout stream, ride horseback through towering pines or gather your crew and try your hand at team penning. Not-to-be-missed is their world-class restaurant and award-winning wine cellar.

Western Montana’s forests are jaw-dropping in autumn. Photo: Triple Creek Ranch

It’s not hard to find a Wild West experience in Glacier Country. Click here to explore more.

Western Montana Wild West Adventures Part 1

Western Montana often conjures up images of cowboys, dude ranches, the Wild West and horseback rides through alpine forests and sweeping mountain valleys. For those looking to take the reins on their own cowboy or cowgirl adventure, Glacier Country can deliver. Our region is chock-full of resorts and ranches that have harnessed Montana’s history and packaged it for your pleasure. Grab your cowboy hat and saddle up in Western Montana.

Your Wild West adventure awaits in Glacier Country.

WILD WEST WEEKEND AT BAR W GUEST RANCH

The Bar W Guest Ranch, near Whitefish, is ready to welcome you any time of year with warm hospitality and packages for the “western hearted.” The Wild West Weekend offers a one-night package that includes a trail ride; wagon ride; skeet, archery and hand gun shooting; and a steak dinner as well as full breakfast. For a longer stay, ladies only are invited for Cowgirl Up!—a weeklong all-inclusive getaway. Relax and soak in the splendor of nature while you ride horseback, rejuvenate with the spa package and bond during a cattle drive.

Cowgirl up with your gal pals at the Bar W Guest Ranch. Photo: Bar W Guest Ranch

DREAM HAVEN

A horseback riding adventure awaits at Dream Haven Ranch. Outside of Marion, Dream Haven Ranch offers three-day or six-day all-inclusive getaways at the rustic and intimate bed-and-breakfast ranch home. Daily trail rides, roping and arena games will help you carry out your cowboy dreams—you’ll even learn to crack a whip. Try your hand at skeet shooting or archery, then end each night with a western home-cooked meal. Western adventures continue in the winter, with trail riding, snowshoeing and sledding excursions.

Ride through alpine forests with Dream Haven Ranch. Photo: Dream Haven Ranch

MCGINNIS MEADOWS CATTLE & GUEST RANCH

The McGinnis Meadows Cattle & Guest Ranch is an authentic working cattle ranch in Libby. The ranch teaches a horsemanship and cattle program, for all levels of riders, in the Buck Brannaman style—a leading philosophy of horse handling that looks at horse training from the horse’s perspective, ensuring the animal feels safe, which forms a true bond with the rider. The McGinnis Meadows Ranch owner, Shayne Jackson, has traveled with Buck to more than 400 clinics over 20 years, and brings his knowledge back to the ranch creating the only Buck Brannaman program in a live ranch setting. The program is taught daily in a clinic style for the duration of your stay; you’ll practice working, driving and roping cattle, as well as trail riding.

Learn new horsemanship skills at McGinnis Meadows Cattle & Guest Ranch. Photo: McGinnis Meadows Cattle & Guest Ranch

THE WILDERNESS CLUB

Saddle up at the Wilderness Club in Eureka. Take a trail ride or carriage/sleigh ride, and enjoy awe-inspiring views of the Kootenai National Forest. Then tee up at the Wilderness Club golf course, designed by golf legend Nick Faldo and ranked the No. 1 golf course in Montana by Golfweek and Golf Magazine. All 18 holes offer stunning vistas and a scenic swing. Who says cowboys don’t like golf? At the end of the day lay your head down in a deluxe cottage.

Enjoy a horseback ride at the Wilderness Club. Photo: Wilderness Club

BEAR CREEK RANCH

You won’t find a more down-home family-friendly feel than Bear Creek Ranch in Essex. Experience warm western hospitality at one of their cabins and enjoy a home-cooked breakfast in the main lodge daily. Immerse yourself in cowboy culture, gathering and herding cattle for the Indian Summer October cattle drive. Some riding experience is needed, as you’ll hit the trails right away. Prepare for long days in beautiful country adjacent to Glacier National Park. Each season at Bear Creek Ranch offers a unique horseback riding vacation.

Herd cows during a cattle drive at Bear Creek Ranch. Photo: Bear Creek Ranch

It’s not hard to find a Wild West experience in Glacier Country. Click here to explore more.

Fall Events and Harvest Festivals in Western Montana

When the green landscapes of summer begin to fade into fall, an unmatched tapestry of golden hues comes out, complementing our impossibly big blue sky. Autumn is one of our most vibrant seasons here in Glacier Country, and fall brings a few of our favorite things: scarecrows, pumpkins, the autumn harvest, seasonal microbrews and bugling elk. Breathe in the cool mountain air, put on your coziest flannel and join us for some of our best fall events. Western Montana’s golden season also brings lighter traffic and shoulder season prices.

Fall brings some of our favorite events. Photo: Rio Chantel Photography

KOOTENAI HARVEST FESTIVAL

The Kootenai Harvest Festival in Libby is a family-friendly festival on the banks of the Kootenai River. Celebrate the harvest of locally grown food and land conservation with live music, sample fare from food vendors and discover Montana-made crafts. Kids activities include face painting, sack races, tug-of-war and more. The festival is free to attend, and a garden-to-table meal made entirely with vegetables grown in Libby is served for an additional charge. Festivities occur mid-September.

Happiness abounds at the Kootenai Harvest Festival. Photo: Annie Gassman and Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness

FALL GATHERING AT THE MOON RANDOLPH HOMESTEAD

The Moon Randolph Homestead is Missoula’s public homestead and a historic district on the National Register of Historic Places. The 160 acres of land was purchased in 1889 by Ray and Luella Moon, who built a small claim shack and slowly planted apple and cherry trees on 30+ acres. In 1907 the Randolphs purchased the homestead and added laying hens, dairy cows, and a vegetable garden to the premises. Purchased in 1996, and soon after reconstructed and preserved by the city of Missoula, the homestead is open Saturday for tours of the old outbuildings and the maintained orchard. The Fall Gathering celebrates another year passed on the homestead. Gather under the full harvest moon for live music from local musicians, cider pressing, a harvest feast with fresh local food and homemade pie. This event is ticketed and occurs mid-September.

Cozy up, and bring the whole family. You won’t want to miss the Fall Gathering. Photo: Rio Chantel Photography

HARVEST FESTIVAL AND APPLE DAY AT THE HISTORICAL MUSEUM AT FORT MISSOULA

Also in Missoula, the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula has three gallery spaces with exhibits that change throughout the year, and sits on 32 acres of land covered with more than 20 preserved Montana buildings and structures. The Harvest Festival and Apple Day is the perfect excuse to head to the museum with family in tow. First visit the Hayes Homestead Cabin to learn how homesteaders would begin to prepare for winter in autumn. Then take the full tour of the outside buildings, make cider with an old-fashioned apple press, or get artsy with fall-themed crafts for the kids. Admission is free with a nonperishable food item for the local food bank, and lunch from local food trucks is available for purchase. This event takes place annually near the end of September.

Crush apples to make fresh cider at the Harvest Festival and Apple Day. Photo: Historical Museum at Fort Missoula

GREAT NORTHWEST OKTOBERFEST

Glacier Country continues to be a haven for beer enthusiasts, with more than 30 breweries in the region. So, of course, one of the ways we celebrate autumn is with an epic Brewfest. The Great Northwest Oktoberfest, in Whitefish, is chock-full of delicious German beer, food, music and unique contests like keg hurling, log sawing and stein holding. Test your skills or cheer on competitors from the sidelines. There is a small admission fee, and food and beer are an additional cost. Prepare to wet your whistle and chicken dance your heart out at the beginning of October.

Savor the sip at the Great Northwest Oktoberfest. Photo: Whitefish Chamber of Commerce

STEVENSVILLE SCARECROW FESTIVAL

Grab a pumpkin spice or vanilla chai latte then head to one of our favorite fall festivals. You’d be hard pressed to find a more unique, family friendly event than the Stevensville Scarecrow Festival. Locals craft the cutest, scariest and most creative scarecrows to be viewed and voted upon by you. After you’ve voted, head to downtown Stevensville for music, food, a farmers market, the Scarecrow Festival Brewfest and more. Children will enjoy the straw bale maze, giant slide and bouncy house, and can compete in a pumpkin-carving contest. This festival takes place annually in early October.

Vote on your favorite piece at the Stevensville Scarecrow Festival. Photo: Visit MT

Fall in Western Montana is a magical season filled with authentic Western Montana events. Find more here.

Hidden Gem Golf Courses in Western Montana

With wide-open vistas and room to roam, it should come as no surprise that Western Montana’s Glacier Country is a golfer’s paradise. Come spring, we gleefully trade our ski poles for golf clubs. Here, we have the perfect blend of breathtaking landscapes, renowned courses and affordability. Pair that combo with small-town charm, and teeing up in Montana is a real treat. Get on the green in Glacier Country, where you’ll find some of the most stunning and enjoyable golf experiences, and get to know our scenic travel corridors while you’re at it.

Sunset bathes hole 12 of the Nick Faldo-designed course at the Wilderness Club. Photo: Wilderness Club

NORTHWEST CORRIDOR

Along Montana’s quiet Northwest Corridor, you’ll find three courses all offering something special. Eureka may be small but it boasts not one, but two golf hot spots. At Indian Springs Ranch play the links-style, 18-hole championship course that’s pure fun. Bask in the beauty of the Tobacco Valley at this unique, master-planned recreational community. Also in Eureka, the stunning Wilderness Club—designed by golf legend Nick Faldo—was ranked the No. 1 golf course in Montana by Golfweek and Golf Magazine and the No. 2 Best New Private Golf Course in the U.S. by Golf Magazine. In Libby, the aptly named Cabinet View Golf Club offers just that—a great game of golf among gorgeous Cabinet Mountain views.

BITTERROOT VALLEY

The beautiful Bitterroot Valley beckons all year long, but any season you can swing a golf club here is extra special. The unique Whitetail Golf Course in Stevensville is located within the Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, so it’s the perfect place to find an authentic Montana golfing experience…and spot some wildlife on the green. Further down U.S. Highway 93 in Hamilton, the Hamilton Golf Course offers a fabulous round of golf and some of the best views in the valley.

Playing the 14th hole at Meadow Lake Golf Resort. Photo: Meadow Lake Golf Resort, Inc.

GLACIER NATIONAL PARK SURROUNDING AREA + EAST GLACIER CORRIDOR

If your trip to Glacier National Park isn’t complete without a round of golf (we don’t blame you), here are four places in and around the park to swing your clubs. Meadow Lake Golf Resort in Columbia Falls is a must-play, and Golf Magazine agrees. Golf Digest gives this treasured course 4.5 stars and named it one of the top four public courses in Montana. Within the park itself, Glacier View Golf Course in West Glacier blends natural beauty with a polished game of golf. Along the East Glacier Travel Corridor in East Glacier Park, tee up at Glacier Park Lodge Golf Course. This historic course on the Blackfeet Reservation is the oldest grass greens golf course in Montana, and all 9 holes are named for former Blackfeet chiefs. At the Cut Bank Golf and Country Club a mile west of Cut Bank, enjoy small-town golf at its finest with an exceptional game and down-to-earth vibes.

TOUR 200

The laid-back Wild Horse Plains Golf Course in Plains is a family favorite along Montana’s scenic Tour 200 just north of Paradise. From there, drive the length of this scenic byway and end up in the quaint town of Thompson Falls for another round at Rivers Bend Golf Course, where every third hole finds you back at the clubhouse.

The Mission Mountain Golf Club offers gorgeous views of its namesake. Photo: Mission Mountain Golf Club

FLATHEAD CORRIDOR

The Flathead Valley has been named a “Top 50 Golf Course Destination” by Golf Digest. There’s no denying the beauty of the region and the caliber of its courses. At the southern tip of Flathead Lake—the largest freshwater lake west of the Mississippi—the Polson Bay Golf Course in Polson offers beautiful mountain views and fairways adjacent to the lake. South of that, in Pablo, the 9-hole executive Silver Fox Golf Course winds its way through lush trees, serene ponds and a wildlife corridor on the Salish Kootenai College campus. Even farther south, take in exceptional Mission Mountain views and a challenging game of golf at the Mission Mountain Golf Club in Ronan.

I-90 CORRIDOR

Experience good old-fashioned Montana hospitality 10 miles west of Missoula at King Ranch Golf Course in Frenchtown, where you’ll find 18 holes on wide fairways along the scenic Clark Fork River. Another I-90 Corridor favorite along the Clark Fork, and one of Western Montana’s hidden gems, is Trestle Creek Golf Course in St. Regis—known for some of the finest greens.

The Double Arrow Lodge features a spectacular golf course plus lodging and dining in Seeley Lake.

SEELEY-SWAN CORRIDOR

The recreation opportunities in the Seeley-Swan Corridor are some of Montana’s best, and golf is no exception. In the storybook village of Bigfork on the north shore of Flathead Lake, the semi-private Eagle Bend Golf Club offers a championship 27-hole course. In Seeley Lake, the pristine ponderosa pine setting of the Double Arrow Golf Course offers resort golfing nestled between the Swan and Mission mountain ranges. Watch wildlife as you make your way around water features and bunkers, and don’t miss the No. 15 signature hole, featuring an elevated tee and island green.

The list goes on—Western Montana is dotted with golf courses, from small-town favorites to large championship and semi-private golf clubs and resorts. Go green under our famous blue sky. For more inspiration, visit the Northwest Montana Golf Association, and read more about Glacier Country’s larger golf courses here.

Added Bonus: In addition to stunning scenery and incredible terrain, golfing in Western Montana won’t break the bank; it’s part of the warm western hospitality we’re known for.

Glacier by Train: See the Park by Amtrak from Cut Bank to Whitefish

Exploring Glacier Country on Amtrak’s Empire Builder is a fun and memorable way for travelers of all ages to see Glacier National Park and experience Western Montana’s small-town charm. A mid-to-late autumn round-trip journey from Cut Bank to Whitefish offers the opportunity to see Western Montana and Glacier National Park draped in fall colors lightly dusted with fresh snow—a uniquely beautiful blending of seasons.

Wide windows make for incredible viewing of Glacier’s golden hues.

From Cut Bank, board the evening train for Whitefish. Conductors will assist riders with loading on. Coach seats are unassigned, but the train cars are spacious, so finding a spot shouldn’t be a problem. After your tickets are checked, we recommend making your way to one of several observation decks between the coach cars. These decks offer incredible views!

All aboard in the charming town of Cut Bank!

Trip-Tip: Book your tickets ahead of time at amtrak.com, where you can also find carry-on and checked-luggage rules.

Amtrak’s coach windows are wide, allowing for excellent sightseeing. Watch the sun set across the plains of the Blackfeet Nation, illuminating the scenic Rocky Mountain backdrop with the last light of day. Snacks and beverages are offered downstairs of the observation deck, or make a reservation for dinner in the restaurant car. The evening ride is quiet and smooth, and, after a three-hour journey, Whitefish—the quintessential mountain town—offers up warm hospitality and cozy accommodations.

See the sights from the comfort of Amtrak’s cozy cars.

The Whitefish train depot is located right downtown, so grab your bags and walk to any number of accommodations. We recommend maximizing your adventure with a finely-crafted local beer at the Great Northern Brewing Company and overnighting at The Firebrand Hotel, where we highly recommend making reservations well in advance.

Good morning, Whitefish. It’s lovely to be here.

Rise and shine to jaw-dropping mountain vistas, well worth the early wake-up. The Whitefish Depot’s alpine architectural style is quaint and cozy and the platform offers gorgeous views of the surrounding hills speckled with golden tamarack pine trees. Check a bag inside, or bring along your carry on. The morning ride through the park is absolutely stunning. From Whitefish, the train takes you west-to-east through Glacier National Park as you make your way back to Cut Bank.

Sit back, relax and take in the Glacial-carved landscape while enjoying a fresh, hot coffee.

The ride into Glacier National Park is very scenic and quite relaxing. See the glacial blue waters of the Flathead River among the orange and gold contrast of trees in their seasonal shade. Grab a cup of coffee or snack from the concessionary downstairs from the observation deck, or make a reservation for breakfast in the dining car. With views like this, you’ll be in awe from any part of the train.

Fall for miles and miles of autumn on an Amtrak adventure.

The vibrant colors and snowcapped peaks of a fall-kissed Glacier Country are always spectacular, but there is something about the view from a train window that makes for a magical experience. You get to cover some serious ground and view the vastness of the landscape, from deep river valleys and high mountain peaks to the beautiful wide-open plains of Browning and Cut Bank. This is one Glacier Country train tour everyone should travel.

Witness the beautiful blending of seasons in Glacier Country.

Reel Talk: Fall Fishing in Montana is Phenomenal

Autumn anglers, this one’s for you. Fall fishing is upon us in Western Montana’s Glacier Country, and we’re chomping at the bit. While fishing the pristine waters of Montana’s rivers, lakes and streams is phenomenal year-round, autumn offers an incredibly authentic angling experience: fewer folks on the water, quieter rivers, and—spoiler alert—October and November offer some of the year’s best trout fishing, and hardcore anglers know it. We may as well call it “trophy trout season.”

Casting for cutthroat trout on the Middle Fork of the Flathead River. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

RIVERS + FISHING ACCESS SITES

If casting a line in a river or stream meandering peacefully through fall’s golden landscape, breathing in the cool mountain air, and hearing the bugle of a bull elk sounds like paradise to you, then grab your waders and come on over to experience the solitude of the season. Good hatches are on tap and monster brown trout are spawning—we wait all year for fall lake runs.

Fish the magical blue-ribbon trout waters of the Blackfoot River, made famous by Norman Maclean’s “A River Runs Through It” and offering some of Montana’s best fishing. Get out your mahoganies, midges and blue-winged olives for fall fly-fishing here, as well as on the Clark Fork River where rainbows are on the rise and fall colors are in full effect. Or, find multiple fishing access site along the winding and scenic Bitterroot River, flowing through the beautiful Bitterroot Valley and ready for your mayflies, hoppers and worms.

For experienced anglers who know how to navigate big rivers and plan to fish with streamers up to five inches long, the Kootenai River below Libby Dam offers huge rainbow trout, a boat ramp and easily accessible shorelines.

Up north near Glacier National Park, the Middle Fork of the Flathead River provides a scenic 9-mile fall float from Moccasin Creek to West Glacier—which takes about four hours this time of year—in stunning emerald-colored waters full of cutthroat trout.

Multiple fishing access sites are available throughout the the state. Consult Montana’s Fishing Access Sites Field Guide for maps, species and land information.

Keeping it reel on the Bitterroot River. Photo: Shea Shaughnessy

LAKE FISHING IN MONTANA

Fishing in Montana usually conjures up images of casting a fly rod in an idyllic river setting, but Western Montana boasts some pretty phenomenal lake fishing. The deep, cold waters of Flathead Lake—the largest freshwater lake west of the Mississippi—offers cutthroat and lake trout as well as whitefish and yellow pike. The Mission Mountain scenery is incredible and western hospitality abounds in the surrounding communities. Seeley Lake is a year-round recreation destination, offering stunning views of the Swan and Mission ranges and excellent bass fishing.

Straddling the U.S.-Canada border in the northwest corner of the state, the 90-mile-long Lake Koocanusa reservoir has been known to produce 10-pound rainbow trout in the fall—one of our best-kept secrets. Lake Como, a few miles north of the quintessential Old West town of Darby, is quite a popular fishing spot in the warmer season. Fall provides an opportunity to fish this local’s favorite with a little more solitude—and bask in the beauty of autumn in the Bitterroot Valley while you’re at it.

Jigging is our preferred method for deep lake fishing, and heavily-weighted jigging spoons your best bet. If you’re stillwater savvy, you might consider lake fly-fishing. Some of the largest fish you’ll find by fly may actually come out of a lake. Make sure to use a special stillwater indicator.

Going on a fishing trip with a knowledgeable outfitter like Glacier Raft Co. can help ensure a great catch. Photo: Glacier Raft Co.

GLACIER COUNTRY FISHING GUIDES

World-class fly-fishing tends to attract world-class fishing guides, and Glacier Country is chock-full of experienced and friendly outfitters and guides with the local knowledge and inside scoop on fishing in Western Montana. They’re always ready and eager to take you out to their favorite fishing spot and help you land the big one. From finding the right fall fly, to steering you toward the best stream, to guiding you down the river on a daylong or overnight float trip, this is their life’s work, and they love every second of it—you will, too.

While wade-fishing is the most common way to fish Western Montana’s rivers and streams, float fishing is becoming increasingly popular, especially on larger rivers, and hiring a guide is your best bet for a successful float-fishing adventure.

Another reason to go with a guide? Western Montana boasts endless off-the-beaten path “secret spot” streams, trickling mountain creeks and hidden alpine lakes. The best way to find these local treasures is to go with a guide who’ll happily share their spot.

For more information on outfitters and guides, visit the Montana Outfitters and Guides Association at montanaoutfitters.org.

Western Montana is a fly-fishing mecca.

FALL FISHING TIPS + TRICKS IN WESTERN MONTANA

Fish the fall run. Stripping big streamers will bring in the biggest brown trout during their fall run mid-October through November or early December. Find a stretch of river downstream of the spawning run of a lake or larger river.

Head for the hatch. November’s baetis (blue-winged olive) hatch offers excellent fall dry-fly-fishing at a time when most of our rivers are experiencing low to no fishing pressure.

Be prepared for any kind of weather and dress accordingly. We can’t say it enough: Montana’s fall weather can have a flair for the dramatic. You could wake up to fresh snow and be fishing in a T-shirt by noon. Or vice versa. Check weather reports before you head out, and always be prepared. Base layers are essential this time of year, especially when wade fishing in a cold stream.

Permits, rules and regulations. A valid fishing license is required for all types of fishing on state waters. To fish in Montana, most anglers need two licenses: a conservation license and a fishing license. Visit Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks for state fishing regulations—including catch and release guidelines and daily possession limits.

Fishing on tribal lands. Western Montana is home to two Indian reservations—the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation and the Blackfeet Tribe of the Blackfeet Reservation. Special rules and regulations apply when recreating on tribal lands. If you’re planning to fish Blackfeet Nation Indian Reservation land, visit Blackfeet Fish and Wildlife Department. For Flathead Reservation fishing regulations, visit the Natural Resources Department of the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes.

For more information on autumn angling adventures in Western Montana, click here or contact Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks.

7 Reasons to Turn a Griz Game Into a Weekend Getaway in Missoula

It’s no secret that we’re serious Griz fans here in Western Montana. The college-football community of Missoula boasts mountains of pride for the Division 1 Montana Grizzlies. Every football season Griz fans flock to the University of Montana’s Washington-Grizzly Stadium to cheer on our beloved team.

Missoula’s population jumps by more than 30 percent on these days! It’s not just the game we love, but the energy and excitement of 24,000 feet stomping to “We Will Rock You” by Queen, the boom of a cannon fired at every touchdown, and the halftime shows by the Grizzly Marching Band, featuring songs from artists like The Beatles and Pentatonix.

A Griz-eye view of Washington-Grizzly Stadium. Photo: Destination Missoula

The game-time spirit is palpable and unwavering. Eager tailgaters set up as soon as possible and the grounds around the stadium are transformed into a celebration of food trucks, vendors and die-hard fans.

With three home games left this season, come immerse yourself in one of Western Montana’s most prized events and explore the idyllic mountain town of Missoula—a Glacier Country arts, culture and recreation hot spot full of charm.

1. AUTHENTIC MONTANA LODGING + HOSPITALITY

Missoula boasts almost 70 hotels, motels and inns, from national chains to locally-owned establishments, and the warmest western hospitality around. Take note and plan ahead: Missoula hotels fill up fast for home games. If you don’t score one in time don’t fret—Missoula has plenty of VRBO and Airbnb rentals.

2. FOOD + DRINK FUN

We love to eat and drink, and we always want the best of both. From fine dining to cafés, and everything in between—including epic tailgate fare—there’s literally something for everyone in this community of creative, sustainable and delicious local cuisine. With 10 breweries, three distilleries, two wineries and a new cidery in a town of 75,000 people, it’s pretty obvious we’re serious about crafting beverages. We’re not lacking for good coffee shops here, either. Seasonal flavors abound this time of year, so it’s an excellent opportunity to savor a taste of Montana.

Enjoy a pumpkin beer or other seasonal brew at one of Missoula’s craft breweries.

3. ENDLESS THINGS TO DO IN MISSOULA

This is one Montana town that bustles year-round. Pack adventure onto either side of the Griz Game festivities. Missoula has a fast-growing renowned live music scene, museums, art galleries and unique shopping options, plus three rivers and an endless system of wilderness trails, so there’s plenty of outdoor recreation to be found here as well.

Hike the “M” for a gorgeous view of Missoula’s fall colors.

4. LOCAL EVENTS LIVEN UP TOWN YEAR-ROUND

Here’s what Missoula’s got on tap during the next three Grizzly home games.

OCTOBER 6 – GRIZ vs. PORTLAND STATE VIKINGS
It’s Grizzly Homecoming Weekend!

Land on Friday and catch a Montana Film Festival show at the Roxy, then stop by Montgomery Distilling for a tour and tasting before taking part in First Friday Gallery Night (don’t miss the Radius Gallery). While downtown, grab dinner at any one of downtown Missoula’s eateries—you can’t go wrong.

Saturday, wake up and head downtown for the Homecoming Parade, featuring music performances, dancers, the Shriners, and more. Then it’s game time. After the game, follow the crowd to a local pub for post-game festivities.

Sunday, grab brunch at Draught Works Brewery and then head to Turner Farms Annual Pumpkin Fest for harvest fun. End the weekend at The Top Hat for a unique five-course Cider Dinner in partnership with Western Cider.

OCTOBER 27 – GRIZ vs. UC DAVIS AGGIES
Join in on the pre-Halloween fun that’s sure to take over Missoula this weekend.

Friday night enjoy the casual atmosphere and contemporary Asian cuisine at the Mustard Seed Asian Café or try Missoula’s new dine-in movie theater.

Saturday morning grab coffee and freshly-baked pastries at the Missoula Farmers Market (voted best of the West),  and the Clark Fork Market. Hike to the M and then head to the game early for some tailgating—hit the GAS Tailgate Party to purchase food and drinks, watch the pregame show, and listen to live music (or a DJ). After the game, make your way to the county fairgrounds for Missoula’s Haunted House.

On Sunday, grab Biers + Brunch at Bayern Brewing and then head to the University of Montana for costumed revelry at the Skeleton Skedaddle 5k & 1k races.

The energy in the stands is electric, particularly on a beautiful fall day. Photo: Destination Missoula 

NOVEMBER 17 – GRIZ vs. MONTANA STATE BOBCATS  

You’ve got two concert options for Friday night in Missoula: The Devil Makes Three takes the stage at 8 p.m. at the historic Wilma theater, and Jeffrey Foucault plays the Top Hat at 9 p.m.

See a show AND the game. The Top Hat and the Wilma are two of the hottest venues in the Northwest. Photo: Neaubauer Media/Logjam Presents

Saturday before the game, stroll the Missoula Valley Winter Market—a local farmers market—for coffee, fresh baked goods, home-grown produce, and local arts and crafts (perfect for Montana souvenirs). Then, walk along the river trail to the game.

Sunday, grab breakfast at The Catalyst Café & Espresso Bar and then hit the streets for some early holiday shopping in Missoula’s downtown galleries and shops. Start at the north end of Higgins Avenue and make your way across the bridge (over Caras Park and the scenic Clark Fork River) to Missoula’s Hip Strip. Grab a sweet treat from Bernice’s Bakery or Le Petit Outre.

5. MISSOULA IS SURROUNDED BY DAY-TRIP-WORTHY ATTRACTIONS

From Missoula you could venture out in any direction and find an authentic Montana adventure. Epic day trips are a dime a dozen here.

Take a scenic drive down the Bitterroot Valley exploring several charming towns along the way. A short way from Stevensville is the Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, home to various types of wildlife. If you visit in October, you are likely to see large flocks of Canadian Geese resting from migration on the ponds.

Root for maroon and silver but also check out our yellows and oranges. Photo: Donnie Sexton

Or, start early and drive north through the stunning Mission Valley and stop near Moiese at the National Bison Range where you can witness 350 – 500 head of bison; if you’re visiting during the fall rut you may even hear the bugle of a bull elk.

6. INSIDER TIPS + TRICKS TO MAKE THE ADVENTURE EVEN BETTER

Pre-Game Like a Griz Fan: When it comes to tailgating, a Griz fan’s game is strong. Get in on the action and mingle with the locals before the game.

Ask a Local: We’re known for being some of the friendliest folks around, so if you’re looking for the inside scoop on where to eat, drink, or play, just ask us.

7. GETTING TO AND AROUND MISSOULA IS EASY

Flying into the Missoula International Airport (MSO) is pretty convenient, serviced by multiple major airlines with direct flights regularly arriving from 11 cities across the U.S. Once you land, car rentals are easy. Or, leave the driving to someone else and call Uber or Lyft, both of which are available in Missoula.

Pro-Tip: Park your car downtown and walk the Kim Williams Trail along the Clark Fork River directly to the University of Montana.

Discover Fall in Glacier Country

We’re sweet on every season here, but we’re especially smitten with autumn. The tapestry of golden hues and hillsides dusted with the first snow complemented by the impossibly blue sky gets us every time, and fall brings a few of our favorite things: flannels, festivals, scenic road trips, seasonal microbrews and farmers markets brimming with pumpkins, heritage apples, ciders and more of our favorite harvest flavors.

Not to brag, but our fall look is pretty spectacular.

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The crisp mountain air beckons, so we get out and about for fall frolic, and then we cozy up fireside. Autumn is our golden season—it’s vibrant, it’s quiet, it’s not to be missed. Traffic is lighter and shoulder season prices kick in. It’s a wonderful time to hop in the car and take a road trip around Glacier Country.

Here’s where and how we like to spend beloved fall days in our corner of Montana.

INTERSTATE 90 CORRIDOR – MISSOULA

The thing about Missoula is that you can explore one of Glacier Country’s hippest cultural hot spots, which bustles all year long, and then pretty much take off in any direction to add a scenic fall drive into the mix. While in town, explore the “Best of the West” outdoor market scene, visit one of 10 breweries, three distilleries and two wineries, pick out a pumpkin and conquer the corn maze, or hike any one of several trails; we love the Rattlesnake Wilderness in the fall.

Fall Bonus: Montana Cider Week (September 29 – October 7) hosts events throughout Montana, with multiple festivities taking place in Glacier Country communities. See what’s happening where and when, and prioritize a stop at Missoula’s new (and first ever) cidery—Western Cider—for a tour and a taste.

We love dining out during all our seasons, but fall cuisine has some extra special flavor. Photo: Top Hat Lounge

Trip Tip: A Missoula favorite, the Top Hat serves up mouthwatering cuisine—like chicken spaghetti squash—amid live music and friendly community vibes. Plan your visit around one of their Tunes & Taste music-infused dinner theme nights.

BITTERROOT VALLEY

This lush forested valley nestled between the Bitterroot and Sapphire mountain ranges is prime for leaf peeping, and the fall rut makes it a spectacular time for watching wildlife at the Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge. Begin in Missoula, and take U.S. Highway 93 south toward Hamilton, stopping along the way in some of Glacier Country’s most charming towns.

Hamilton’s Daly Mansion boasts 50 kinds of trees—all gorgeous this time of year—and offers haunted hayrides at the end of October. Top off your tour at Backroad Cider or betterRoot Cidery for some fresh-pressed deliciousness—the core of fall flavor.

It doesn’t get much more festive than Stevensville’s Scarecrow Festival. Photo: Donnie Sexton

Fall Bonus: Plan your trip around a Ravalli County Museum Ghost Tour, Victor’s Field of Screams, Stevensville’s famous Scarecrow Festival or Hamilton’s McIntosh Apple Day—hailed as one of Montana’s Best Fall Festivals.

Trip Tip: Bike “The Root” instead! The Bitterroot Trail is a 50-mile-long paved bike path following the same route mentioned above, perfect for a vibrant autumn cycling adventure.

TOUR 200

Montana Tour 200 in Sanders County from Dixon to Heron travels along scenic riverbanks (bursting with fall color), active wildlife and ample outdoor recreation opportunities. Stop for a soak in the mineral waters at Quinn’s Hot Springs Resort, nestled in Paradise along the Clark Fork River. Afterwards, stop in Thompson Falls for a home-cooked meal at Minnie’s Montana Café, or enjoy a drink and exceptional fall views from the deck Big Eddy’s.

Fall greets winter in Thompson Falls. Photo: Kate Baxter

Trip Tip: Lace up your hiking boots near Trout Creek and hike to the beautiful Vermilion Falls or Graves Creek Falls.

SEELEY-SWAN CORRIDOR

Between the stunning Swan and majestic Mission mountain ranges, the Seeley-Swan Valley boasts hundreds of pristine alpine lakes and beautiful hiking spots. Kayak around picturesque Holland Lake, canoe the Clearwater Canoe Trail or hike Morrell Falls, all spectacular ways to take in the fall spectacle. This exceptionally scenic valley is known for its large population of tamaracks—unique pine trees that lose their needles in the fall, setting Montana’s hillsides aflame with vivid shades of yellow and orange.

If you take U.S. Highway 83 from Seeley Lake all the way to Bigfork (as you should), this storybook village on the northeast shore of Flathead Lake, does not disappoint. Bigfork’s Whistling Andy Distilling serves up award-winning whiskeys and spirits made with Montana-grown grains and fruits. Savor some Harvest Select Whiskey, perfect for the season. From Bigfork, head south on State Highway 35 to The Raven Bar & Grill in Wood’s Bay for delicious waterfront dining, craft cocktails and some of the best views in the area.

A road trip to an event on Flathead Lake is always filled with incredible views.

Fall Bonus: Visit Seeley Lake mid-October and meet some of Montana’s finest artists, see their work and tour area studios, galleries and museums during the Alpine Artisans – Tour of the Arts, or land in Bigfork on October 13 for Tamarack Time!—an annual local’s-favorite amateur food competition akin to a county fair—and be sure you’re hungry.

Trip Tip: Make your Glacier Country getaway an overnight adventure with an authentic Montana lodging experience at the Double Arrow Resort in Seeley Lake, offering four-season recreation, cozy accommodations and incredibly warm hospitality.

FLATHEAD CORRIDOR

The west side of Flathead Lake is equally as scenic and charming as the east. If you’re coming from the south on U.S. Highway 93 or State Highway 200, stop in Moiese for wildlife watching at the National Bison Range. You may even get to experience bull elk bugling in the fall rut. Further north, in Charlo, visit Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana and Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge with stunning wide-open panoramas of the Mission Mountains. Then, on to Flathead Lake where jaw-dropping views await.

Fall Bonus: The Tamarack BrewFest take place in Lakeside, October 13. Enjoy live music, line dancing, canoe races, local vendors and evening bonfires, all taking place in this stunning fall Flathead Lake location.

HIGHWAY 2 CORRIDOR LIBBY TO KALISPELL

Running through Western Montana’s northern region, Highway 2 travels along some of the most scenic places in Glacier Country and introduces road-trippers to off-the-beaten-path treasures and well-known attractions. Begin in Libby, one of the region’s most scenic and quietest corners and end in Kalispell, the perfect mix of small-town Montana and old-west charm. Ghost chasers can head to the Conrad Mansion for a ghost tour.

Fall Bonus: Meander 4,000 bales of hay at Kalispell’s Whitefish Stage Organic Farm hay bale maze. This family-fun autumn activity also includes a barrel train ride, hay ride, super trampoline, petting zoo, pumpkins and more.

Get lost in Glacier Country. Photo: Whitefish Stage Organic Farm

Trip Tip: Linger in Kalispell for good food, shopping and museums, plus the whimsical autumn wonderland of Sweet Pickin’s Pumpkin Patch, where you’ll find plenty more than gourds.

GLACIER NATIONAL PARK SURROUNDING AREA

The park is absolutely breathtaking in autumn. Traffic is light, shoulder-season prices are in effect, and communities in and beyond the park are celebrating the season. Explore the outdoors by boat in Whitefish on Whitefish Lake, or take to the trails by bike or by foot on The Whitefish Trail or the Swift Creek Loop, and then stop in for delicious food at Casey’s Whitefish pub and grill, featuring rooftop dining options—especially scenic right about now.

Raise a glass to our amazing local brews at the Great Northwest Oktoberfest. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

A bit closer to the park, Columbia Falls offers the perfect place to swap adventure stories over burgers and craft beer at Backslope Brewing. Try one of their rotators on tap this fall: Chocolate Hazelnut Stout. When it’s time to turn in, Cedar Creek Lodge offers a truly exceptional Montana lodging experience, and their pool and hot tub are open year-round.

Fall Bonus: The Great Northwest Oktoberfest takes place in Whitefish, and, because one weekend is not enough, join us for two weekends of authentic German beer, food, music and fun with a Montana flair, September 27 – 29 and October 4 – 6.

Trip Tip: There’s still time to get on the green at Meadow Lakes Golf Course, open until mid to late October.

We packed quite a bit of autumn adventure in for you, and now it’s time for you to pack your bags and head to Western Montana’s Glacier Country for the perfect fall road-trip experience.

Scenic Drives + Small-Town Discovery: Meet Thompson Falls + Tour 200

Thompson Falls is stunning in every season. Photo: Kate Baxter

First things first: Let’s talk 200. Discovery is inevitable on this road less traveled. State Highway 200 offers access to a slice of Montana that may not be on your radar, but should be. This treasure trove of outdoor recreation in the northwest part of the state is also chock-full of small-town surprises for those who like to wander off the beaten path.

The section of Highway 200 from Dixon to Heron is so scenic it’s been designated “Montana Tour 200.” It humbly winds its way through the Cabinet and Coeur d’Alene mountain ranges, with diverse side trips, scenic drives and backroad adventures offered all along the route. Recreation and solitude abound here, and so does authentic western hospitality. Folks are friendly and the lodging is cozy.

Where to stop…

Milepost 50 is where it’s at. Touted as a town “where the weather is always better than the forecast,” Thompson Falls boasts the warmest climate in the state. But that’s not all that makes it a year-round outdoor recreation hotspot. Nestled between the Lolo and Kootenai national forests, public lands are plenty, and “getting away from it all” is easy as pie. (We’ll talk more about pie in a sec.)

Hunting for solitude along a trail near Thompson Falls. Photo: Thompson Falls Main Street

Finding solitude here is pretty simple. Thousands of miles of trails offer adventure in every direction. Fall and winter are especially good for hunting and fishing—Outdoor Life magazine listed Thompson Falls #16 of the 35 best hunting and fishing towns in the country. It’s also a haven for hikers that’s exceptionally beautiful in the golden hues of autumn, and winter offers a snow-globe setting that’s simply magical by snowshoe. Pro tip: Quinn’s Hot Springs is right down the road in Paradise, and a post-adventure soak in Paradise sounds pretty heavenly, if you ask us.

Steam rises from the pools at Quinn’s Hot Springs Resort in Paradise, Montana.

Speaking of winter, one of our favorite winter activities is snowmobiling, and the Thompson Falls area offers a motorized mecca for powder hounds. There are plenty of winter recreation opportunities including snowshoeing and sledding, but make sure to bring your own gear with you when you come.

Snowshoeing with the best kind of companion. Photo: Thompson Falls Main Street

In short, Thompson Falls is pretty awesome and totally unassuming. It’s also so friendly it’ll knock your socks right off and then offer you a nice spot to put your feet up by a warm fireplace. Actually, you’ll find that’s pretty common in Western Montana’s Glacier Country. Come Tour 200 and see for yourself.

THOMPSON TIPS:

Christmas on Main Street
Get festive in the Falls the first full weekend in December. Shop Main Street’s BUY LOCAL! event with fun activities, including the Main Street Scavenger Hunt, topped off with an evening parade for the whole family. The weekend also includes a musical at the local theater, a gingerbread competition at the Old Jail Museum and a Christmas Craft Show.

Island Park
There’s a little island on the Clark Fork River, and that little island has a park on it where you can view the Thompson Falls dam, a fish ladder, the Clark Fork River and valley, powerhouses, two bridges (including the newly renovated Historic High Bridge) and an old substation. Take a stroll down one of many trails and enjoy a picnic lunch with an incredible view.

Built in 1915, the Thompson Falls Dam can be found on the Clark Fork River.

Minnie’s Montana Café
This mom-and-pop must-stop is a local favorite for homestyle cooking and comfort food, and, of course, that pie we mentioned earlier. The pie so good here you’ll be wondering if your grandmother is hiding in Minnie’s kitchen.

You must try Minnies Montana Cafe on Main Street.

Little Bear Ice Cream
Ice Cream in the winter? Yes please. Even after pie? Absolutely. When it’s some of the best ice cream in the state, you’ll be in the mood for Little Bear any time of year.

Save room for dessert at Little Bear.

See you on 200.