Category Archives: American Indian

12 Things To Do in Browning: Discover Western Montana’s Blackfeet Nation

In the velvety, rolling foothills just east of Glacier National Park, the culture and traditions of the American Indian thrive. The largest community on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Browning, Montana is home to the state’s biggest tribe—the Blackfeet Nation. Museums, shops, galleries and annual celebrations preserve the Blackfeet way of life, and give travelers an authentic glimpse into their heritage.

Browning is the heart of the Blackfeet Nation, one of the two American Indian tribes in Glacier Country.

NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN DAYS

Experience one of the largest gatherings of U.S. and Canadian tribes, featuring traditional games and dancing, a pow wow, and horse relay races. Every summer for four days during the second week of July, Browning hosts this family-friendly, not-to-be-missed authentic celebration.

Sculptures tell the creation story of the Blackfeet people. Photo: Debbie Picard

HEART BUTTE INDIAN DAYS

Witness four days of traditional American Indian dress, dancing and drumming, plus a parade, pow wow, stick game tournament and other traditional activities. Heart Butte Indian Days are held annually the second week of August in Heart Butte, just 26 miles south of Browning.

PONOKAMIITAA RELAY RACES

Head to Browning’s Charging Home Stampede Park for the unique and lively Indian relay races where loyal fans gather to cheer on their favorites. 2018’s first annual event was a roaring success and 2019 dates will be announced soon.

This historic and high-energy event is a cannot miss while visiting Browning. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

CHIEF MOUNTAIN

Take in the unique shape of one of Montana’s most majestic mountains, also believed by the Blackfeet to hold special powers. This natural landmark bordering Glacier National Park and the Blackfeet Reservation provided a “cultural center” for many tribes, and today makes for a scenic day trek for experienced hikers. The views from the summit are nothing short of spectacular. Visitors traveling along Chief Mountain Highway will be able to see the peak from afar.

FISHING + HUNTING ON TRIBAL LANDS

Anglers, hunters and outdoor enthusiasts find solitude and serenity on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, but make sure you are up to speed on rules and regulations for recreating on tribal lands before you head out for some much needed R&R.

Surrounded by stunning mountains, lakes and valleys, the Browning area offers incredible recreation experiences.

BLACKFEET HERITAGE CENTER & ART GALLERY

View the works of more than 500 Native American artists and craftspeople from 19 different tribes, including beadwork, jewelry, quillwork, pottery, rugs, kachinas, moccasins, carvings, bronze work and sculptures, plus baskets, rawhide and horse hair work, drums, dolls and hides at the Blackfeet Heritage Center & Art Gallery. Fine art exhibits include original watercolors, acrylics, oils, wood relief and prints. Also find commemorative coins and a complete baby Tyrannosaurus skeleton.

FAUGHT’S BLACKFEET TRADING POST

You mustn’t leave Montana without taking home something to remember us by. Authentic American Indian souvenirs and gifts can be found at Faught’s Blackfeet Trading Post. Choose from clothing—including American Indian clothing and western wear—books, pictures and prints, lotions, beading supplies and many other Montana-made American Indian arts and crafts.

LODGEPOLE GALLERY + TIPI VILLAGE

Spend the night in a tipi! Browning’s Lodgepole Gallery & Tipi Village offers unique lodging in the foothills of the breathtaking Rocky Mountains. Stay in a real tipi complete with a fire ring for an authentic American Indian experience. Explore the prairie, tour buffalo jump sites and tipi rings, and meet the village’s herd of Spanish Mustang horses. The Lodgepole Gallery displays contemporary and traditional fine art, including Blackfeet art and intricate Blackfeet beadwork.

The art, culture and skies of the Blackfeet Nation are truly amazing. Photo: Andrew Betino

GLACIER PEAKS HOTEL + CASINO

Hit the jackpot in the heart of Blackfeet Country. Montana channels Las Vegas at Glacier Peaks Casino, where locals and visitors enjoy some of the largest payouts in the state. Glacier Peaks is open 24 hours, seven days a week and offers more than 500 machines, blackjack, craps, poker, roulette and more, plus a full-service bar, fine dining and modern accommodations.

WESTERN CURIOS

This Browning mainstay has been a popular visitor attraction for years. At Western Curios you’ll find Blackfeet and Glacier Park logo souvenirs, moccasins, local crafts, Made in Montana items—including our beloved huckleberry products—breads, spices and Montana Silversmith jewelry. Stop in and find some goodies to take home with you.

MUSEUM OF THE PLAINS INDIAN

Discover the rich, historic and diverse arts of Northern Plains Tribal peoples at Browning’s popular Museum of the Plains Indian. The museum’s fascinating and educational exhibits include historic clothing, horse gear, weapons, household implements, baby carriers and toys, to name just a handful. The gift shop features fine American Indian jewelry.

The Museum of the Plains Indian has exhibits depicting the rich diversity and history of the tribal peoples of the Northern Plains. Photo: Racene Friede

SCENIC DRIVES

Highway 2 from Browning to East Glacier Park really holds its own, especially if you’re thinking about beating the crowds and saving the Going-to-the-Sun Road for another day. You’ll find 14 miles of stunning scenery, and there’s just something quite awesome about driving towards the majestic peaks of Glacier National Park. Along the way, spot the Blackfeet’s own herd of bison.

Highway 89 from Browning to Saint Mary Lake makes for an unbelievably stunning drive that picks up the east end of the jaw-dropping Going-to-the-Sun Road. Stay and play at the awe-inspiring lake, or continue on to crisscross Glacier National Park via one of the most beautiful drives in the U.S.

It doesn’t get much more scenic than this. Photo: Debbie Picard

8 Things To Do in the Charming Town of Cut Bank, Montana

The treasured little Glacier Country town of Cut Bank is cozied up against the backdrop of the breathtaking Rocky Mountains just under an hour from Glacier National Park. Along the eastern border of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, history, tradition, western adventures and outdoor opportunities abound in this stay-and-play, full-service community, complete with comfortable lodging, friendly hospitality and a personality all its own.

We’ve got a list of things for you to see and do in Cut Bank, one of Glacier Country’s most charming small towns.

EVENTS + FESTIVALS

Montana Shakespeare in the Parks makes an annual stop in Cut Bank City Park each summer, and the whole town turns out for the beloved annual Lewis and Clark Days Festival, featuring live music, a chili cook-off, a parade, a car show, games and more.

The Cut Bank City Park is home to the community’s popular events for locals and visitors to enjoy.

GLACIER COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM + ARCHIVE

Devoted to local history, the 14-acre Glacier County Historical Museum includes a 1917 schoolhouse, an oil worker’s house and derrick, an old caboose, Lewis and Clark exhibits, and a replica of a homestead house and farm. On weekends, interact with costumed characters circa 1915, who help demonstrate what life might have been like for Montana homesteaders.

History runs deep in Cut Bank. Learn all about it at the Glacier County Historical Museum. Photo: Racene Friede

HISTORICAL SITES

Three historically significant sites along the Lewis & Clark Trail are located in the Cut Bank area: Camp Disappointment, Cut Bank Camp and the Meriwether Lewis Fight Site. Follow in the Footsteps of the Corps of Discovery, the first American expedition to cross the western portion of the United States.

DOWNTOWN HISTORICAL MURALS

Set against the wide-open landscape, explore multiple downtown murals dedicated to the history of this unique community, commemorating Cut Bank’s homesteading roots, the importance of agriculture and cattle ranching, the Lewis and Clark Expedition and American Indian history.

Murals depicting the history, lifestyle and rich culture of the area can be found all around downtown Cut Bank.

OUTDOOR RECREATION

Enjoy some of the best stream fishing in the state, plus tubing, boating, upland bird/waterfowl hunting, bird-watching and camping. Or, take to the green at the Cut Bank Golf and Country Club, offering a 9-hole course (for all skill levels) and excellent views.

CUT BANK TRAILS

Hiking and biking your way around Cut Bank keeps getting easier with the expanding Cut Bank Trail System. Take the Coulee Trail along the Cut Bank Creek Coulee, using the east trailhead at 7th Avenue S. and Dean Drive, or the west trailhead at Mountain View Boulevard and Lookout Road.

The Coulee Trail System along Cut Bank Creek is easily accessible and seriously scenic.

CUT BANK CREEK BREWERY

What we love most about the Cut Bank Creek Brewery—aside from their exceptional, finely crafted brews—is their philosophy of good people, good beer and good living. We can’t help but agree. Stop by this neighborhood gathering place for cold beer, handcrafted ginger ale, locally roasted coffee, live music and board games. Rub elbows with the locals and see just how good living in Cut Bank is.

Add the Cut Bank Creek Brewery to the list of Montana breweries we love.

CUT BANK FARMERS MARKET

One of the things Montana does best is put on a good farmers market. Cut Bank lays on the charm Wednesdays from 3 – 6 p.m. (seasonally) at Cut Bank City Park. Shop local—from fresh foods, baked goods, produce and flowers, to artisan crafts, woodworking and handmade soaps. The Hutterites are a mainstay of the Cut Bank Farmers Market—try their fresh, local eggs!

From homegrown fruits and vegetables to pies, breads and homemade jams, the Cut Bank Farmers Market is the real deal.

TRIP TIP + PHOTO OP: Do not miss the 27-foot-tall penguin—Cut Bank’s roadside landmark is actually impossible to miss. The towering penguin claims bragging rights to calling “the coldest spot in the nation” home.

See Glacier Country’s most famous penguin!

Come see Cut Bank; getting here is easy, with an international airport for private planes, an Amtrak station, and easy access off U.S. Route 2. Road trip anyone?

Beyond the Park: Explore Western Montana’s Glacier Country

The Crown of the Continent. The Backbone of the World. Heaven on Earth. Glacier National Park boasts some pretty apt nicknames. But did you know the epic beauty and unrivaled adventure extend well beyond park boundaries? From charming small towns to pristine rivers and recreation areas, Montana offers a wonderland of discovery.

Blodgett Canyon Overlook shows off Western Montana’s classic big-mountain views. Photo: Noah Couser

Summertime is the park’s busiest season, making it the perfect time to explore what the rest of Western Montana’s Glacier Country has to offer. Here’s a list of things to do and places to see outside the park, plus a few tips and tricks to navigate our peak season and busiest times of day.

SCENIC DRIVES
The stunning scenery and glacial-carved terrain roll right on out of the park for hundreds of miles in every direction. Take the road less traveled on some of Montana’s scenic byways for a jaw-dropping drive in some of the country’s most beautiful landscapes. The best part? There’s usually a backroad adventure or hidden small-town treasure around every bend. Hit the road on one of our favorite routes:

Highway 200: Bonner to Clearwater Junction
Highway 83/Highway 12: Lolo to Idaho
St. Regis-Paradise Scenic Byway
Montana Tour 200 
Highway 2, Kalispell to Troy
Highway 89, St. Mary to Choteau
Lake Koocanusa Scenic Byway

WILDLIFE VIEWING
Sometimes the best way to spot our majestic wildlife is to go where the crowds aren’t. Western Montana is a birder’s paradise and haven for creatures big and small, offering some pretty incredible viewing areas. Remember to bring your binoculars and always follow wildlife safety guidelines—this is grizzly country, after all! Head to one of our most-treasured wildlife habitat areas:

National Lee Metcalf Wildlife Refuge
National Bison Range
Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge
Bull River Wildlife Management Area

HIKING
One of the easiest ways to cover ground in and get up close and personal with Montana is to head out on your own two feet. Every single one of our trailheads leads to a path of discovery, running the gamut from easy rambles to backcountry wilderness treks. You’ll find sprawling valleys, wildflower-filled meadows, towering peaks, pristine alpine lakes and waterfalls, lush forestland and quiet canyons, all offering an awe-inspiring and unforgettable adventure. The following wilderness areas offer of miles upon miles of trails to explore, or check out more of our favorite trails here.

Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex
Cabinet Mountains Wilderness
Mission Mountains Wilderness Complex

OUTSIDE PLAY
From rodeos to rock climbing and zip lining to llama trekking, Western Montana offers infinite ways to play. Here, we hit the rivers and lakes for boating, rafting and world-class fly-fishing. We explore small towns for real cowboy adventures and relaxing yoga retreats. We take to the trails by bike and by horseback. Below are some of our favorite ways to play, Montana style:

Biking: Whitefish Bike Retreat
Gondola Rides: Whitefish Mountain Resort
Rafting: Adventure Missoula
Fly-Fishing, Kootenai Angler
Yoga Retreats: Dancing Spirit Ranch
Horseback Riding: Swan Mountain Outfitters
Llama Trekking: Swan Mountain
Rock Climbing at Lake Koocanusa: Rock Climb Montana
Cowboy Up: Rodeos

With Swan Mountain Outfitters, see Western Montana by horseback, on a llama or on your own two feet. Photo: Donnie Sexton

HISTORY + CULTURE
Montana’s rich heritage and breathtaking vistas inspire a cultural landscape you’ll not want to miss. From two Indian Nations—the Blackfeet and the Flathead—to numerous museums, galleries, theaters, historical sites, farmers markets, shops, eateries (from fine dining to food trucks) and watering holes (did we mention we have more than 20 breweries and distilleries?) you’ll be planning your next visit before this one’s even over. Check out the following Montana must-see cultural destinations:

Bigfork Summer Playhouse  
Missoula Art Museum  
Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana
Museum of Mountain Flying
Smokejumper Visitor Center

The Missoula Art Museum showcases a thriving art scene in Western Montana. Photo: Slikati Photography

LODGES + CABINS
Staying outside the park gives you the opportunity to explore some of our border-town communities infused with the spirit of Glacier Country and that warm western hospitality we’re known for. Take advantage of beyond-the-park adventures and then head into the park at less crowded times of day. Here are three friendly and memorable places to get cozy beyond park boundaries:

Averill’s Flathead Lake Lodge
Park Cabin Co.
Polebridge Cabins

STATE PARKS + FISHING ACCESS SITES
Psst…did you know that Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks fishing access sites are also campsites? Check out their website for campsite info. We love our state parks, and while many do reach capacity throughout the summer, they offer a true and unforgettable Western Montana outdoor experience. Make your way to one of the following public-land paradises: 

Logan State Park 
Thompson Falls State Park
Placid Lake State Park  
Salmon Lake State Park 

Swim, boat, fish and play at Placid Lake in the Swan Valley, a Glacier Country gem. Photo: Kelsey Lau

PEAK SEASON TRAVEL TIPS + TRICKS
Glacier National Park is expecting another record year for visitor numbers. Planning your trip with this in mind can help you navigate some of the peak-season challenges. Check out Glacier National Park’s Twitter feed for real-time updates on parking-lot statuses, weather, road closures, and other important information. Webcam feeds are also updated on Glacier website for some of the park’s most popular spots.

Here are few other tips and tricks we recommend for making your visit to Glacier National Park enjoyable and memorable:

  • Take a Tour: Help reduce traffic and hop on a bus for an educational and interactive tour with Red Bus Tours or Sun Tours. Check on the Glacier Institute’s list of summer programs and outings.
  • Shuttle it: Ride Glacier National Park’s Free Shuttle System.
  • Plan for delays: With a record number of people heading to Glacier National Park this summer, roads, parking lots and trails will be busier. Pack extra food and water, and set aside a little extra time to fully enjoy your adventure in The Crown of the Continent.

One of the best experiecnes you can have in Glacier National Park—a Red Bus Tour.

There’s so much to see and do in Glacier Country. From our charming small town to the Going-to-the-Sun Road, we’ve got a lifetime of discovery and experiences to offer. Come see for yourself!

Celebrate our Tribal Nations: Pow Wows and Events in Western Montana

Established as a state in 1889, Montana boasts sweeping plains, big blue skies, majestic mountains and an amazingly rich history. But Montana’s history didn’t begin with Lewis and Clark’s expedition of the West; it began thousands of years prior. The plains and mountains that make up Montana are rich with cultural heritage—a deep, colorful tapestry that weaves tradition, art, music, dance, storytelling, adventure, industry and leisure. This creates a place of awe-inspiring spirit and wonder.

A trio of Blackfeet dancers in Glacier National Park.

Home to seven Indian reservations and 12 tribes: the Assiniboine, Blackfeet, Chippewa, Cree, Crow, Gros Ventres, Kootenai, Little Shell, Northern Cheyenne, Pend d’Oreilles, Salish and Sioux, each of these tribal nations observes and celebrates their own distinct story, heritage and traditions.

Western Montana’s Glacier Country is home to two Indian reservations—Flathead and Blackfeet—that share their culture against a backdrop of sacred landscapes, often through pow wows and storytelling.

Experience our beautiful history with the following sacred events.

Blackfeet Nation

North American Indian Days

This summer will mark the 67th Annual North American Indian Days in Browning, Montana. July 12 – 15, 2018, experience authentic Blackfeet customs, like traditional and fancy dancing, listen to the beauty of the drum and be a part of one of the largest gatherings of Plains Indian Tribes in North America.

Blackfeet dancers performing under the shadows of Glacier National Park.

Heart Butte Celebration

Tradition is revered August 9 – 12, 2018 in the community of Heart Butte (26 miles south of Browning) at this annual four-day celebration. Tipis and wall tents line the pow wow grounds, setting the scene for contest dancing, games and sporting events.

Flathead Indian Reservation

Annual Arlee 4th of July Celebration

Celebrate the 120th Annual Arlee Celebration June 28 – July 4, 2018 at the Arlee Powwow Grounds in Arlee, Montana. This pow wow is the premier annual celebration of the Salish and Pend d’Oreille tribes. Filled with traditional dance competitions, singing, traditional drumming and a huge July 4 parade, this celebration is a must.

Dancers compete at the Arlee Pow Wow. Photo: Chad Harder

Standing Arrow Pow Wow

The 41st Annual Standing Arrow Powwow takes place July 13 – 15, 2018 at the Elmo Pow Wow Grounds in Elmo, Montana. Vendors, dancers, drummers and visitors from Canada. The Kootenai nation and its Kootenai Cultural Committee will host this beautiful gathering. Experience the sights and sounds of this amazing pow wow for an unforgettable experience.

Competitors gather at the Standing Arrow Powwow.

Hidden History Gems: Meet Montana’s Off-The-Beaten-Path Museums

History buffs + eager explorers—this one’s for you. Western Montana is home to several museums, some of which are a little off the beaten path, making them all the more explore-worthy. These hidden gems display everything from American Indian beadwork to homesteader history to storied lake monsters, and each one offers a celebration and preservation of Montana’s rich heritage, coupled with a unique adventure in small-town discovery.

The eclectic Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

TROY MUSEUM & VISITOR CENTER
Troy, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Step back in time and experience the cultural and natural heritage of Troy Learn about Troy’s homesteading days, mining and logging life, and the 1910 fire, and play a round of folf (frisbee golf) at the museum’s on-site course. If you time it right, you can attend the Arts on the Grass event on the museum lawn, where local artists and craftspeople sell their handmade work, perfect for taking something home to remember us by.

OLD JAIL MUSEUM
Thompson Falls, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Visit one of Sanders County’s oldest buildings, now honoring the pioneers who settled our corner of Big Sky Country. The Old Jail Museum was formerly the county jail, and sheriff’s office and residence. View historical artifacts, maps and photographs taken from original glass negatives giving a glimpse into the early days of mining, logging, farming and ranching in Sanders County. Also, the town of Thompson Falls is a hidden gem in and of itself, offering Clark Fork River access and pristine national forestland recreation.

NINEPIPES MUSEUM OF EARLY MONTANA
Charlo, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Nestled in the breathtaking Mission Mountains, this Mission Valley treasure protects and preserves the history and culture of the Flathead Indian Reservation, home to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. You’ll find American Indian artifacts (including a large collection of beadwork); a life-size diorama of wildlife in an early camp scene complete with elk-hide tipis; vintage photographs; a collection of weaponry; and a gallery of Old West art. Ninepipes offers tours and a nature trail, plus it’s close to the National Bison Range and bordered by Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge, so be prepared to spend some time in the area.

Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana display’s the history and culture of the Flathead Indian People.

MUSEUM OF THE PLAINS INDIAN
Browning, Montana
Open: Year-Round
This permanent exhibition gallery displays a diverse and bountiful collection of historic art created by tribal people of the Northern Plains, as well as contemporary work by American Indian artists and craftspeople. You’ll find traditional, detailed costumes on life-size figures. Other displays exhibit the social and ceremonial aspects of the region’s tribes. Help support individual artists and craftspeople by taking home a meaningful souvenir. The museum galleries offer oil paintings, watercolors, sculptures, beadwork and traditional crafts for sale.

Blackfeet exhibit at Museum of the Plains Indian. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

TOBACCO VALLEY HISTORICAL VILLAGE
Eureka, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Sitting along the Tobacco River, this unique, volunteer-run village houses a collection of historic buildings from the 1880s and early 1900s. Explore a schoolhouse, church, library, general store, fire tower, railroad depot, caboose and several log cabins, all outfitted with era-appropriate artifacts. Interpretive programs are also offered on site. Bring a picnic lunch, and explore the adjoining Eureka Riverwalk Trail or the Eureka Kootenai Rails to Trails/Tobacco River Memorial Trail.

LARUE-HOT SPRINGS MUSEUM
Hot Springs, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Paying homage to the Hot Springs homesteader days, this little gem showcases a gathering of artifacts from local tribes and homesteader families, plus a large doll collection and the trophies and ribbons won by local resident Fay Hayne, a local trick rider and barrel racer. Also on display, 120 years of VFW uniforms and memorabilia, antique farming equipment and trucks, plus artifacts from local merchants, craftsmen and ranchers. Explore a historic cabin and the original Hot Springs concrete jail.

GLACIER COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM & ARCHIVE
Cut Bank, Montana
Open: Year-Round
This museum includes a captivating collection of historical artifacts, buildings and memorabilia on display, as well as a comprehensive early history of the people of the region, including a vast Blackfeet Indian collection. The 14-acre site is home to two museum exhibit buildings, an oil worker’s house, oil derrick, 1917 schoolhouse, 1980’s caboose and a living-history interpretive replica homestead house and farm. History buffs can also find educational and interactive exhibits on Lewis and Clark, local artists, community businesses, oil and Cut Bank’s early days.

The Glacier County Historical Museum has numerous displays and exhibits of the county’s diverse past.

POLSON FLATHEAD HISTORICAL MUSEUM
Polson, Montana
Open: Memorial Day – Labor Day
Home of the Flathead Lake Monster—a 7.5-foot, 181-pound sturgeon caught in Flathead Lake in 1955—the Polson-Flathead Historical Museum offers firsthand examples of the trials of surviving the harsh conditions of the region’s homesteading days. Exhibits include a trading post, stagecoaches, a chuck wagon and buggies, a pioneer kitchen, Calamity Jane’s saddle from her “Last Ride,” firefighting equipment and antique trucks that still work!

SEELEY LAKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM
Seeley Lake, Montana
Open: Year-Round
The old Double Arrow Ranch barn is now the site of the Seeley Lake Historical Museum and Visitor Center, recalling the past of the Seeley Lake region. Outside displays include a horse-drawn log-haul wagon, a gravel haul and spread wagon, a Lewis and Clark Botanical Garden, Blackfoot Indian Lodge, a dugout canoe and a forthcoming 100-year-old canoe. The grounds also include seven double (two-horse) stalls featuring locally-themed displays named after the horses who occupied them, such as Nip & Tuck: Old Time Logging; Ace & Joker: Norman Maclean Fire and Fish Display; and Popcorn & Peanuts: Cabin Fever Cures.

BRAND BAR MUSEUM
Ovando, Montana
Open: Year-Round
Formerly a saloon once referred to as the “Bucket of Blood,” the Brand Bar Museum today houses Ovando memorabilia and stories of days gone by. This collection of local history and unique antiques also has a hoosegow—a jail for visitors—where you can overnight in a bunk (or you can camp out on the lawn). The Brand Bar Museum is always open. Just ask one of the nearby local businesses for the key. You’ll find it.

A Blackfoot Valley gem: The Brand Bar Museum. Photo: Montana Office of Tourism and Business Development

RAVALLI COUNTY MUSEUM & HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Hamilton, Montana
Open: Year-Round
Blending art with local and natural history, this cultural venue provides rare historical collections honoring our American Indian heritage, life in the West and the travels of Lewis and Clark. Educational programming includes lectures, tours and workshops for children. The museum serves as a hub for community events, including McIntosh Apple Days, A Cowboy Christmas and Bitter Root Day, and is situated at the confluence of the Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail, the Nee-Me-Poo National Historic Trail and the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.

Montana: Sometimes There Are No Words

Every once in a while, there are moments when this girl wonders if the last few days have been real. Once such moment happened last week.

I’d been on the road for work for several days and had seen some pretty amazing Montana moments along the way. As I was searching for the words to describe what I’d seen and felt, I realized that sometimes no words are needed.

This my friends, is one of those times.

Taking in the view at Whitefish Mountain Resort.

Taking in the view at Whitefish Mountain Resort.

 

Watching the sunrise at Tally Lake.

Watching the sunrise at Tally Lake.

 

The view from a Montana backroad.

The view from a Montana backroad.

Watching the next generation marvel at the majesty of Trail of the Cedars in Glacier National Park.

Seeing the next generation marvel at the majesty of Trail of the Cedars in Glacier National Park.

American Indian dancers in Glacier National Park.

American Indian dancers in Glacier National Park.

The early morning mystery at Many Glacier in Glacier National Park.

The early morning mystery at Many Glacier in Glacier National Park.

Greeting the day with a red bus tour in Glacier National Park.

Greeting the day with a red bus tour in Glacier National Park.

The view toward Logan Pass from the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

The view toward Logan Pass from the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

xo,
TT

A Montana Road Trip: Part One

Some weeks are awesome. This past week, my Montana lovin’ friends, was one of them.

Why? Because it was spent road tripping from Missoula north along Highway 93 into the Flathead Valley with a group of lovely ladies.

Our goal for the week: To experience as much Montana goodness as we possibly could within five days. And boy howdy, did we ever.

Here’s a look at the first part of our road trip in Montana’s Glacier Country…

An evening stroll through Missoula's Caras Park.

An evening stroll through Missoula’s Caras Park.

Kicking back at Kettlehouse Brewery in Missoula.

Kicking back at Kettlehouse Brewery in Missoula.

The Smokejumper Visitor Center.

The Smokejumper Visitor Center.

The stunning St. Ignatius Mission. (A look inside will reveal 58 hand-painted murals on the walls and ceilings).

The stunning St. Ignatius Mission. (A look inside will reveal 58 hand-painted murals on the walls and ceilings).

The view from Allentown Restaurant at Ninepipes Lodge in Charlo.

The view from Allentown Restaurant at Ninepipes Lodge in Charlo.

Experiencing American Indian culture at The People's Center in Pablo.

Experiencing American Indian culture at The People’s Center in Pablo.

Kerr Dam near Polson. (This was one of my favorite stops on the road trip).

Kerr Dam near Polson. (This was one of my favorite stops on the road trip).

The Hockaday Museum of Art in Kalispell.

The Hockaday Museum of Art in Kalispell.

Downtown Whitefish. Adorable.

Downtown Whitefish. Adorable.

Our home for the evening: The Garden Wall Inn.

Our home for the evening: The Garden Wall Inn.

Every once in a while, you just need to get lost (in Montana).

Every once in a while, you just need to get lost (in Montana).

It’s been a lovely week.
TT

PS: Stay tuned for part two of our road trip, coming next week.

Exploring the Blackfeet Nation

Last week, I headed over to the east side of the Continental Divide to spend a bit of time on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. Bordering the east side of Glacier National Park, the Blackfeet Nation is a beautiful place where the wind-swept plains meet the rolling foothills before being engulfed by the impressive rise of the peaks of the Rocky Mountains.

Looking down into Glacier National Park's Two Medicine Valley.

There’s something about the Blackfeet Nation that feels almost magical to me. Perhaps it’s the hours my family spent here when I was just a little blond-haired missy. Or maybe it’s the wild beauty of it that nearly takes my breath away. Perhaps it’s the rich history, culture, heritage and strength of the Blackfeet people. But to pick just one thing that makes this land so special is nearly impossible. So I won’t. And I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Blackfeet warrior sculptures greet visitors at the Blackfeet Nation's four entrances.

The tribe's bison herd relaxes in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains.

Happy trails,
TT

PS: To learn more about the Blackfeet Nation, visit glaciermt.com.

Summer In Montana: Bring Your Party Pants

Montana is epic in the summer.

In my mind, it really doesn’t get better than this…there’s something about summer that makes me come alive. (In the interest of full disclosure, winter, spring and fall are all beautiful times of year to play in Big Sky Country).

Maybe it’s the 14+ hours of daylight, the smell of fresh cut grass, flowers blooming everywhere, kids riding their bikes down quiet streets, people cooling off after a hot day with a soak in the river, the freedom of eating ice cream every day (just because) or the simple beauty of it all.

Hello old friend.

Whatever it is, I’m hooked.

While we have great events year-round (I’m talking about you Whitefish Winter Carnival, Travelers’ Rest Winter Storytelling Series and Seeley Lake Winterfest), in the summertime each community rolls out the red carpet and celebrates traditions, events, activities and festivals that make their town so special. And this summer is no different, with the main events heartily underway.

And as I like to think of myself as your host, it’s my responsibility to tell you about some of the stellar upcoming events that will be rocking under Montana’s big blue sky in the coming weeks.

North American Indian Days, 7/12 – 7/15
Happening now on the Blackfeet Nation, this is one of the largest gatherings of United States and Canadian Indian Tribes. It also features a parade, Pow Wow, rodeo, traditional games and food.

A Blackfeet dancer.

Montana Baroque Music Festival, 7/17 – 7/19
Located in the aptly named community of Paradise, the festival features some of the finest baroque music by world-class musicians.

Rods & Classics Show & Shine, 7/21
Held each year in Thompson Falls, this car show features a beautiful collection of classic cars on a grassy field near the Clark Fork River.

A summer scene in downtown Thompson Falls.

Daly Days, 7/27 – 7/28
This event celebrates Marcus Daly and the heritage of Hamilton, located in Montana’s Bitterroot Valley. The celebration includes reenactments at The Daly Mansion, mansion tours, a parade and street dance.

Hamilton’s Daly Mansion.

Lewis & Clark Festival, 7/27 – 7/28
Held each year in Cut Bank, this festival honors the journey of Lewis & Clark as they made their way through the rugged land of Montana on their way to the Pacific Coast. It includes free concerts, a parade, site tours and a horseshoe competition.

Western Montana Fair and Rodeo, 8/7 – 8/12
A true celebration of summer, the fair features a rodeo, games, rides and exhibits for the whole family.

For more events, visit glaciermt.com.

Happy summer,
TT

PS: Travel deals are available throughout the region for the summer months. Check out the latest deals and coupons.

Montana: This is Winter Country

Winter arrived late to Western Montana. My guess? She wanted to make an entrance. And that’s fine with me…I’m not going to point fingers, cuss her out or give her the silent treatment. Why? Because she’s here now and let’s face it, she really looks quite lovely.

In the last week, fresh powder has fallen on our ski areas, snowmobile trails and mountain meadows, making everyone around here giddy with excitement, anticipation and a hankering that can only be relieved from playing in the snow.

And play we will.

As part of the Montana experience of winter, several communities host events and activities that showcase this season, and her slightly rambunctious attitude, at its finest. And with so many things to choose from, I’ve compiled some of my suggestions to help ensure that winter treats you like a lady. (Or a gentleman).

Some of my suggestions:

Seeley Lake Winterfest, Seeley Lake
While Seeley Lake is a bootie-kickin’ year-round destination, they do it up right in the winter. Winterfest, held January 20 – 22, features a snow sculpture contest, torchlight parade, bonfire, desserfest (yes, please) and live entertainment. The Seeley Lake Biathlon (featuring skiing and shooting) is also held in conjunction with Winterfest.

A snow sculpture at Seeley Lake’s Winterfest.

Chinese New Year, Hot Springs
Celebrate the Chinese New Year in the cute community of Hot Springs on Saturday, January 21, with festivities including a dragon dance parade, drumming and bio-luminesce fire dancers. The bonus? Catching the fireworks from the outdoor hot springs pool at Symes Hot Springs Hotel.

Whitefish Winter Carnival, Whitefish
Held February 3 – 5, Winter Carnival is really winter at its best. The carnival includes a grand parade, fireworks display, torchlight parade and Black Star Beer Barter. And if you’re up in that neck of the woods in January, attend Whitefish Skijorning, January 27 – 29.

Whitefish Skijoring. Photo by Larry Turner.

Winter Storytelling Series, Lolo
Each year Travelers’ Rest State Park hosts a winter series that celebrates the age-old Salish tradition of sharing history through stories. This winter’s series features talks (held every Saturday) by Kootenai Tribal Members, Salish Tribal Elders, historians and authors.

A cozy cabin in the woods. Photo by Donnie Sexton.

Happy winter,
TT

PS: For sweet travel deals, check out the DEALS page on glaciermt.com.